Jeremy S. Logue, PhD

Associate Professor
Regenerative and Cancer Biology

Areas of Study

Cancer, cell migration, and the cytoskeleton

Education

  • National Institutes of Health2011-2016Post-Doc
  • University of Washington2011PhD
  • University of Oregon2004BS

Research

Cancer, cell migration, and the cytoskeleton are integral parts of embryonic development, immune surveillance, and wound healing, whereas in cancer, the de-regulated migration of tumor cells promotes the metastatic colonization of vital organs.  The Logue Lab is interested in understanding how cells migrate within tissues.  Previously, we demonstrated that cancer cells respond to mechanical confinement by undergoing a phenotypic transition to fast amoeboid (leader bleb-based) migration (Logue, JS et al. (2015) eLife).

Temporal color-code image of F-actin in a melanoma cell undergoing fast amoeboid (leader bleb-based) migrationAt left, temporal color-code image of F-actin in a melanoma cell undergoing fast amoeboid (leader bleb-based) migration.

During fast amoeboid migration, cells move in the direction of a ‘leader bleb.’  Leader blebs contain a rapid cortical actin flow that, combined with non-specific friction, provides the motive force for cell movement.  Because Leader Bleb-Based Migration (LBBM) may be used by cancer cells in diverse physiochemical environments, it likely promotes distant metastasis.  Metastasis to vital organs accounts for the vast majority of cancer related deaths.  To study fast amoeboid (leader bleb-based) migration, we combine in vitro and in vivo assays with high-resolution imaging.  We aim to determine how diverse motile cell types, including cancer and immune cells, adapt to the diverse physiochemical properties of tissues.  Our long-term goal is to rationally develop therapeutics that specifically prevent or abate the growth and migration of cancer cells.