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Center for Immunology and Microbial Disease

Curriculum


 

AMC 502 Research Topics in the Biomedical Sciences
  Credits: 1
Course Director: Dr. Mark Fleck
  This literature based colloquium will introduce students to the current research in the biomedical sciences with an emphasis on the primary literature. This course will involve student presentations and round table discussions in topical areas that are being covered in AMC 515. This course is required of all first year students.
(Year 1, Fall Semester only)
   
AMC 507 Introduction to Scientific Integrity
  Credits: 0
Course Director:
Dr. John Kaplan
  Students attend a total of three, two-hour class meetings and participate in workshops and discussions. Short readings will be assigned. Sessions will address current issues in scientific integrity, ethical principles and theory, introduction to ethics case analysis, an ethical skills workshop, and considerations in selecting a mentor. At the end of this course students will have a basic appreciation of ethical principles in relation to standards of professional conduct in science. Students will also develop their skills and confidence in their ability to analyze and discuss ethical and professional standards as they apply to specific aspects of scientific research. This course is required of all first year students.  Required for AMC 612.
(Year 1, Fall Semester only)
 
AMC 510 Biochemistry
Credits: 2
Course Director:
Dr. Carlos de Noronha

A major challenge to biomedical students is gaining  a better understanding of the structures, functions and interactions of molecular systems used in nature. The elucidation of protein and membrane structure, the role of enzymes in metabolic processes and cell signaling, and the modeling of life processes in the laboratory provide fundamental insights into normal physiological processes and into pathophysiological conditions. This course will provide an integrated exposure to major current concepts in biochemistry including protein structure, enzymology, membrane structure/function, and metabolism. This course covers three central themes common to all advanced courses within the various training programs: Protein Structure/Function, Biological Membranes, and Metabolism.  The first block of lectures includes the topics primarily on bioenergetics and metabolism. It will include a set of three conferences to integrate and review the material taught in each section.  AMC-510-Biochemistry, was carefully planned to integrate with "AMC-511-Molecular Cell Biology" and "AMC-515-Foundations of Biomedical Research." Together these three courses will provide MS and PhD students at AMC with the fundamentals that they will need to begin their research careers.
(Year 1, Fall Semester only)

 
AMC 511 Molecular Cell Biology
Credits: 3
Course Directors:
Dr. Rebecca Keller, Dr. John Schwarz
The overall goal of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of molecular and cell biology and the relevance of these topics to normal and pathophysiology. This course is part of a new integrated core curriculum for all first year graduate students designated to give students the fundamentals needed for upper level graduate courses, to read primary literature, and to understand the health relevance of the basic sciences. The Learning Objectives of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the following:
  1. Mechanisms and regulation of the flow of genetic information from DNA to protein.
  2. Genetics and its role in disease.
  3. How cells interact with each other and their extracellular environment
  4. Basic signaling cascades and the regulation of cell proliferation and survival.
  5. The structural components of cells and the regulation of these components, including the cytoskeleton, intracellular compartments and vesticular trafficking.

(Year 1, Fall Semester Only)

   
AMC 515 Foundations in Biomedical Research
Credits: 4
Course Director:
Dr. Richard Keller

Biomedical research builds on molecular, biochemical, cellular, and whole animal studies to understand the workings of cells, tissues, and organ systems. This course introduces students to experimental approaches using biomedical research. The goal of this course is to provide first-year graduate students with an understanding of basic experimental approaches used in biomedical research in order to jumpstart their ability to understand the primary literature and to plan and execute their own research. To this end, the course will cover the principles and theory behind currently used experimental approaches and their applications, practical details for those that are commonly used, as well as examples from the primary literature.
(Year 1, Fall Semester Only)

   
AMC 600 Biostatistics
 

Credits: 2
Course Directors:
Dr. Paul Feustel, Dr. Peter Vincent

  This course is designed to teach the student basic statistics so that they can perform appropriate statistical analysis of their research and so they can determine if appropriate analysis was performed when reading the literature in their field of study.  The first part of the course will be lecture/exercise based sessions run by the faculty that will expose students to basic principles and tests commonly used in biostatistics, including sessions on what inferential statistics is and determining the statistical analysis as part of your experimental design.  In the second part of the course students will bring in experiments and/or data from their laboratory and describe the experimental design and the statistical test that was used (or will be used) to analyze the data and how this allowed (or will allow) them to formulate a conclusion from the data.
(Fall Semester only)
   
AMC 607 Reactive Oxygen Species & Nitric Oxide in Physiology & Pathophysiology

Credits: 2
Course Directors:
Dr. Dana Crawford, Dr. David Jourd'heuil

This course will cover the role of oxidant-mediated injury in human pathology using didactic instruction and review of published research papers.  Basic mechanisms of injury caused by reactive oxygen- and reactive nitrogen-species will be covered as well as antioxidant mechanisms of protection.  In addition, current literature will be reviewed and critically evaluated for evidence supporting a role for oxidant-mediated pathogenesis in various disease states such as cancer, brain disorders, atherosclerosis, immune system dysfunction, diabetes, cataracts, and disorders of metal metabolisms.  Student evaluation will be based on class participation, class presentations and exams.
(Offered every other year, Spring Semester only)

 
AMC 612 Discussions in Scientific Integrity

Credits: 1
Course Director:
Dr. John Kaplan

This course will utilize a case study based discussion format to provide a vehicle for students to learn and reflect upon the responsible conduct of research.  Topics to be covered include an overview of ethical theory, conducting research, reporting research, peer review, handling research materials and information, mentoring and laboratory supervision, misconduct in research, conflict of interest, human subjects and clinical research, animals in research and genetic research.  This course will also familiarize students with both internal and national policies regulating research conduct.  (This program fulfills the NIH requisite for predoctoral students and postdoctoral fellows on National Research Service Award Training Grants.) 
Instructors:  This course is team-led by a basic scientist and ethicist.  It utilizes the text, "Teaching the Responsible Conduct of Research Through a Case Study Approach", prepared by the American Association of Medical Colleges. 
Prerequisite:  AMC 507
(Year 2, Fall Semester)
 
IMD 501 Research
Credits: Variable (Maximum 15 credits per semester)
Course Director:
Student's Mentor
Thesis laboratory work.  Students must register for thesis research every semester following the first year. 
(Required all semesters) 
 
IMD 502 A Research Colloquium
  Credits: 1 (first year only; P/F subsequent years) 
Course Director: Dr. Carlos de Noronha 
  Student research symposium in which all CIMD students present their own research or critically evaluate a journal article of broad scientific interest.  Required attendance and participation throughout each student's tenure.  More than three unexcused absences will result in a Fail grade. However, only one credit will count towards each student's total didactic credits.  Presenters: CIMD faculty, postdoctoral fellows and graduate students 
(Required all semesters)
 
IMD 504 A, B,C Research Techniques in Biomedical Science  (Lab Rotations)
 

Credits: 1
Course Director:
Dr. Thomas D. Friedrich

  This course consists of research rotations to be completed during the first year of study. Master Students are required to complete two rotations.  Ph.D. Students are required to complete three rotations.  All rotations are to be completed prior to mentor selection. 
Instructors: Rotation mentor  
(First year only)
 
 
IMD 602 Cellular & Molecular Immunology 
Credits: 3
Course Directors: Dr. William Lee, Dr. Timothy Sellati

An advanced graduate level course that focuses on the cellular and molecular basis of the immune response. The general format will include lectures and the presentation of key papers for class discussion.  Prerequisite:  IMD 608 
(Offered every other year)

 
IMD 608 Immunology
Credits: 3
Course Director: Dr. James Drake
A basic immunology course designed for both students and technicians with a focus in immunology as well as those with a desire to obtain a broad understanding of the current topic in immunology.  The course closely follows the textbook Cellular and Molecular Immunology, 7th Edition, by Abbas, Lichtman and Pillai.  Classes are a combination of didactic lectures, small group discussions, and a limited number of brief student journal club style presentations.  Student evaluations will be based on three (3) exams (including both an in-class and take-home section), in-class presentations, and classroom participation.  The goal of the course is to provide students with a solid foundation in modern immunology.
(Year 1, Spring Semester only)
 
IMD 609 Microbial Disease
Credits: 4
Course Directors: Dr. Karsten Hazlett, Dr. Carlos de Noronha, Dr. Karen Duus, Dr. Thomas Friedrich
Students will learn how bacteria and viruses replicate and interact with the host.  The course includes lectures, literature discussions, and student presentations that will help the student develop skills to critically evaluate scientific literature in microbial disease.
(Year 1, Spring Semester only)
 
IMD 611 Advanced Molecular Virology: Biodefense, Emerging and Re-emerging Infections
Credits: 3
Course Directors: Dr. Carlos de Noronha, Dr. Karen Duus
This course will have a literature-based lecture/discussion format of diverse research investigations within the field of molecular virology.  Topics of inquiry will include viral pathogenesis, evolution, immune evasion, transmission, and oncogenesis.  The course objectives include developing proficiency in i) evaluating and reviewing molecular virology literature; ii) employing the scientific literature to follow a line of investigation; iii) developing hypotheses and working models with which to test hypotheses; and iv) designing experiments to test hypotheses.  Lecturers will guide the students through the process of analyzing primary research papers centered on a specific molecular virology question, and then moderate discussions on how to develop hypotheses and design experiments to continue the line of research.  During the course of the semester, the students will write and present a review article and a short research proposal on a specific molecular virological topic of their choice.  Exams will focus on experimental design and data analysis.  Exams and the two papers/presentations will each be one-third of the course grade.  Students will receive a letter grade for the course.  Prerequisite:  IMD 609 or consent of the Course Directors. 
(Fall Semester only)
 
IMD 620 Special Topics in CIMD
  Credits: 1
Course Director: Dr. Mario Canki
   This course will address selected topics in Immunology and Microbial Disease using current and historical research at the discretion of CIMD Students and Faculty. Students are encouraged to solicit faculty to offer courses addressing issues of special interest to them.      
(Offered both semesters)
 
No Course # Monday Seminar
  Credits: 0 (P/F)
Course Director: Dr. Dennis Metzger
  Guest Speakers (locally and nationally known) present relevant material during this weekly seminar and hold a question and answer session at the end.  Attendance is required for all students.  More than three unexcused absences will result in a Fail grade. 
(Required all semesters) 
 
No Course # Journal Club
  Credits: 0 (P/F)
Course Directors: Dr. Dennis Metzger and Dr. James Drake
  Students may choice either Immunology Journal Club or Molecular Cell Biology Journal Club. These clubs meet once per week and discuss scientific articles of interest with the group. Students and Faculty participate and lead the group in discussion.  Attendance is required for all students. 
(Required all semesters) 

29 Didactic Credits are required for Ph.D. Degree
50 Research Credits are required for Ph.D. Degree

    18 Didactic Credits are required for M.S. Degree
    20 Research Credits are required for M.S. Degree

    30 hours of Research = 1 Research credit
    Students are limited to 15 Research credits per semester