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Center for Neuropharmacology & Neuroscience

Curriculum


 

Year 1

Year 2

Fall Semester   Biochemistry
  Molecular Cell Biology
  Colloquium in Biomedical Sciences  
  Introduction to Integrity in Science
  Selected Topics in Neuroscience
       (seminar)
   Neuroscience Journal Club
   Research Rotations
  Neuroanatomy & Nervous System
          Disorders
  Research
  Selected Topics in Neuroscience
        (seminar)
  Neuroscience Journal Club
  Electives
Spring Semester   Cellular & Molecular Neuroscience   
  Fundamentals of Pharmacology
  Selected Topics in Neuroscience
  Neuroscience Journal Club
  Research Rotations
  Biostatistics
  Research
  Selected Topics in Neuroscience
  Neuroscience Journal Club
  Electives
 

Year 3

Year 4 and beyond

Fall Semester   Research
  Selected Topics in Neuroscience
  Neuroscience Journal Club
  Electives
  Research
  Selected Topics in Neuroscience
  Neuroscience Journal Club
  Electives
Spring Semester   Research
  Selected Topics in Neuroscience
  Neuroscience Journal Club
  Electives
  Research
  Selected Topics in Neuroscience
  Neuroscience Journal Club
  Electives


For detailed course info see below!

Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree
Students in the Ph.D. program are required to take a minimum of 26 hours of course work, 12 hours of lab rotations, seminars and journal clubs and 50 hours of thesis research in order to complete the degree requirements. Most course work is completed by the end of the second year of the program. At the end of the Spring semester, all second year students must take a written exam. The purpose of this exam is to evaluate student progress in two areas: comprehension of the scientific basis of pharmacology and neuroscience, as well as the student's ability to use that knowledge to address research problems. Prior to September of their fourth year, each student must complete an oral examination to become a candidate for the Ph.D. The purpose of this examination is to determine if the student is qualified to carry out thesis research. This exam, which is based on the form of a grant proposal, examines the student's comprehension of the area of focus, their research skills, and their ability to development a viable research project. The Ph.D. program normally takes approximately 5 years of study. Students in this program are expected to attend all CNN-sponsored seminars including the Distinguished Scientist Lecture Series. 

All full-time students must be registered for a minimum of 10 credits per semester.

 

Year 1, Fall Semester

AMC 500/

Biochemistry: Protein Dynamics, Membranes and Cellular Energetics

Credits: 4

 

This course will provide the foundation of modern biochemistry on proteins dynamics, enzymology, membrane biochemistry and cellular energetics required for topical areas in biochemistry presented in the Spring. A particular focus will be the state-of-the art of biochemistry that has arisen from the techniques of molecular biology. Topical areas to be covered protein folding, protein-protein interaction, drug -receptor interactions, allosterism, protein turnover, membrane assembly, and metabolic flux as related to bioenergetics. Co-taught with the State University of New York at Albany School of Public Health. Semester: Fall; All first year students must take this course.

 

Dr.  Kathy Herrick-Davis, Dr. Terry Wagenknecht

 

AMC 502/

Research Topics in the Biomedical Sciences

Credits: 1

 

This literature based colloquium will introduce students to the current research in the biomedical sciences with an emphasis on the interdisciplinary research programs at AMC. This course will involve student presentations and round table discussions in topical areas that are being covered in AMC 500 and AMC 505. All first year students must take this course.

 

Dr. Mark Fleck

 

AMC 505/

Molecular Cell Biology: Molecular Genetics, Information Flow & Transmembrane - Signaling

Credits: 4

 

A foundation in molecular cell biology will be provided with an emphasis on model genetic systems, transcription, protein synthesis, structural cell biology and cellular signaling. This course will lay the foundation for topical areas found in each Interdisciplinary Research Center Spring Flagship courses: IMD 608: Immunology; IMD 609: Microbial Disease; CBCR 603: Signal Transduction; and CBCR 604: Tissue Remodeling & Cell Motility, NEU 606: Cellular & Molecular Neuroscience, NEU 607: Fundamentals of Pharmacology, CS 608: Cardiovascular Physiology and CS 609: Respiratory & Renal Physiology. This course is co-taught with the State University of New York at Albany School of Public Health. All first year students must take this course.

 

Dr. Susan LaFlamme, Dr. Robert Glaser

 

AMC 507/

Introduction to Scientific Integrity

Credits: 0

 

Students attend a total of four class meetings and participate in discussions. Short readings will be assigned. Sessions will address current issues in scientific integrity, ethical principles and theory, introduction to ethics case analysis, and an ethical skills workshop. At the end of this course students will have a basic appreciation of ethical principles in relation to standards of professional conduct in science. Students will also develop their confidence in their ability to analyze and discuss ethical and professional standards as they apply to specific aspects of scientific research. This course is required of all first year students.

 

Dr. John Kaplan, Dr. Wayne Shelton

 

NEU 502/

Neuroscience Journal Club

Credits: 1

 

This course is designed to teach students how to read and criticize current literature, and to help students learn how to communicate scientifically. Student presentations and participation are an integral part of this course. Center for Neuropharmacology & Neuroscience Students, faculty and post-doctoral fellows will make presentations on their own research or critically evaluate a journal article of broad scientific interest. Participation is an integral part of this course. Students are required to register for this course every semester that they are fully matriculated.

 

Dr. Mark Fleck

 

NEU 504 A/

Research Rotations

Credits: 1 each

 

Research laboratory rotations of 10-12 weeks (including a 2-5 page report)are to be completed during the first year of study. Ph.D. students are required to complete three rotations in different laboratories as a prerequisite to selecting a mentor. Masters of Science students must complete two rotations prior to selecting a mentor.

 

Faculty

 

Year 1, Spring Semester

NEU 502/

Neuroscience Journal Club

Credits: 1

 

This course is designed to teach students how to read and criticize current literature, and to help students learn how to communicate scientifically. Student presentations and participation are an integral part of this course. Center for Neuropharmacology & Neuroscience Students, faculty and post-doctoral fellows will make presentations on their own research or critically evaluate a journal article of broad scientific interest. Participation is an integral part of this course. Students are required to register for this course every semester that they are fully matriculated.

 

Dr. Mark Fleck

 

NEU 503/

Selected Topics in Neuroscience

Credits: 1

 

This course is designed to teach students how to present their work effectively. The course is comprised of our general seminar program of invited speakers as well as seminars presented by our students. It provides the opportunity to hear the latest research progress in a number of pertinent areas, to see how experienced researchers present their data, and to give students experience in presenting their own data. Students also meet as a group to review and discuss all student presentations. While the course runs during both the Fall and Spring semesters, each student presents their research only once and all students register for the course only in the Spring semester.

 

Dr. Lauren Jacobson

 

NEU 504 B,C/

Research Rotations

Credits: 1 per rotation

 

Research laboratory rotations of 10-12 weeks (including a 2-5 page report)are to be completed during the first year of study. Ph.D. students are required to complete three rotations in different laboratories as a prerequisite to selecting a mentor. Masters of Science students must complete two rotations prior to selecting a mentor.

 

Faculty

 

NEU 606/

Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Credits: 3

 

The material presented will provide an overview of the nervous system including the specialized structures of neurons and glia in relation to their functions. The two major areas of rapid cellular communication in the nervous system, conduction of electrical impulses along axons and chemical neurotransmission at synapses, will be covered in depth. Representative neurotransmitter systems will be discussed in detail, including their function, developmental neurobiology and the cellular basis of learning and memory in simple neuronal systems will be presented.

 

Dr. Richard Keller, Dr. Allan Schneider

 

NEU 607/

Fundamentals of Pharmacology

Credits: 2

 

An introduction will be provided to the principles by which drugs and other bioactive substances are absorbed, distributed and metabolized and how they act on biological systems. Topics include drug-receptor interactions, drug-effector interactions and pharmacokinetics.

 

Dr. Lindsay Hough

 

Year 2, Fall Semester

NEU 501/

Research

Credits: To be Arranged

 

These credits are earned during thesis research in the laboratory. The number of credits is determined by the mentor.

 

Faculty

 

NEU 502/

Neuroscience Journal Club

Credits: 1

 

This course is designed to teach students how to read and criticize current literature, and to help students learn how to communicate scientifically. Student presentations and participation are an integral part of this course. Center for Neuropharmacology & Neuroscience Students, faculty and post-doctoral fellows will make presentations on their own research or critically evaluate a journal article of broad scientific interest. Participation is an integral part of this course. Students are required to register for this course every semester that they are fully matriculated.

 

Dr. Mark Fleck

 

NEU 605/

Neuroanatomy and Nervous System Disorders

Credits: 3

 

This course provides both a comprehensive overview of the anatomy of the brain from a systems perspective as well as an introduction to the major neurological and psychiatric disorders with known brain pathology.

 

Dr. Abigail Snyder-Keller

 

NEU 6xx/

ELECTIVES (see choices below)

Credits: Variable

   
 

Faculty

 

Year 2, Spring Semester

NEU 501/

Research

Credits: To be Arranged

 

These credits are earned during thesis research in the laboratory. The number of credits is determined by the mentor.

 

Faculty

 

NEU 502/

Neuroscience Journal Club

Credits: 1

 

This course is designed to teach students how to read and criticize current literature, and to help students learn how to communicate scientifically. Student presentations and participation are an integral part of this course. Center for Neuropharmacology & Neuroscience Students, faculty and post-doctoral fellows will make presentations on their own research or critically evaluate a journal article of broad scientific interest. Participation is an integral part of this course. Students are required to register for this course every semester that they are fully matriculated.

 

Dr. Mark Fleck

 

NEU 503/

Selected Topics in Neuroscience

Credits: 1

 

This course is designed to teach students how to present their work effectively. The course is comprised of our general seminar program of invited speakers as well as seminars presented by our students. It provides the opportunity to hear the latest research progress in a number of pertinent areas, to see how experienced researchers present their data, and to give students experience in presenting their own data. Students also meet as a group to review and discuss all student presentations. While the course runs during both the Fall and Spring semesters, each student presents their research only once and all students register for the course only in the Spring semester.

 

Dr. Lauren Jacobson

 

NEU 608/

Biostatistics

Credits: 3

 

This is a course in basic biostatistics, which includes lectures on the mathematics necessary to understand statistical analysis. Integral to the course are instructions for proper experimental design and the appropriate use of statistical tests.

 

Dr. Jeffrey Carlson

 

NEU 6xx/

ELECTIVES (see choices below)

Credits: Variable

 

Faculty

 

 

 

Year 3 and Beyond, Fall Semester

NEU 501/

Research

Credits: To be Arranged

 

These credits are earned during thesis research in the laboratory. The number of credits is determined by the mentor.

 

Faculty

 

NEU 502/

Neuroscience Journal Club

Credits: 1

 

This course is designed to teach students how to read and criticize current literature, and to help students learn how to communicate scientifically. Student presentations and participation are an integral part of this course. Center for Neuropharmacology & Neuroscience Students, faculty and post-doctoral fellows will make presentations on their own research or critically evaluate a journal article of broad scientific interest. Participation is an integral part of this course. Students are required to register for this course every semester that they are fully matriculated.

 

Dr. Mark Fleck

 

NEU 6xx/

ELECTIVES (see choices below)

Credits: Variable

 

Faculty 

 

 

 

Year 3 and Beyond, Spring Semester

NEU 501/

Research

Credits: To be Arranged

 

These credits are earned during thesis research in the laboratory. The number of credits is determined by the mentor.

 

Faculty

 

NEU 502/

Neuroscience Journal Club

Credits: 1

 

This course is designed to teach students how to read and criticize current literature, and to help students learn how to communicate scientifically. Student presentations and participation are an integral part of this course. Center for Neuropharmacology & Neuroscience Students, faculty and post-doctoral fellows will make presentations on their own research or critically evaluate a journal article of broad scientific interest. Participation is an integral part of this course. Students are required to register for this course every semester that they are fully matriculated.

 

Dr. Mark Fleck

 

NEU 503/

Selected Topics in Neuroscience

Credits: 1

 

This course is designed to teach students how to present their work effectively. The course is comprised of our general seminar program of invited speakers as well as seminars presented by our students. It provides the opportunity to hear the latest research progress in a number of pertinent areas, to see how experienced researchers present their data, and to give students experience in presenting their own data. Students also meet as a group to review and discuss all student presentations. While the course runs during both the Fall and Spring semesters, each student presents their research only once and all students register for the course only in the Spring semester.

 

Dr. Richard Keller, Dr. Lauren Jacobson

 

NEU 6xx/

ELECTIVES (see choices below)

Credits: Variable

Faculty

 

 

 

Electives

NEU 605L/

Neuroanatomy Laboratory

Credits: 1

 

The purpose of this course is to provide the student who is enrolled in NEU 605 (Neuroanatomy & Nervous System Disorders) with lab exercises designed to reinforce and enhance understanding of the gross and histological anatomy of the human nervous system through hands-on demonstration and dissection. Each class will consist of a brief introduction followed by text-guided laboratory in which students work in small groups with faculty assistance. Students will utilize preserved human brain and spinal cord material, sheep brains, plastic-embedded brain sections, models, atlases and online resources. A second purpose is to provide the student with training for their future as educators of medical and allied health students. ***Must be currently enrolled in NEU 605 (BMS 612) or have completed it with a grade of C or better.

 

Dr. Tara Lindsley

 

NEU 612/

Developmental Neuroscience

Credits: 2

 

This course focuses on cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the development of the central and peripheral nervous system. Lecture topics include neural induction, histogenesis, neuron migration, axon guidance, synaptogenesis and apoptosis. Also included are lectures on the modification of synaptic connections in development and regeneration, coordination of neural development with organogenesis, and the use of genetically modified animal models to probe gene function. In addition, students read and discuss article representative of current research on each lecture topic.

 

Dr. Sally Temple, Dr. Tara Lindsley

 

NEU 613/

Receptor Pharmacology

Credits: 2

 

The course will cover the molecular biology and pharmacology of receptors. Introductory material will include an in-depth approach to the molecular dynamics of the ligand-receptor interaction. This will be followed by lectures on the three major families of receptors: the G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), the tyrosine kinase receptors (TK), and the ligand-gated ion channel receptors. Graduate level biochemistry is a prerequisite.

 

Dr. Milt Teitler

 

NEU 614/

The Biology of Addiction

Credits: 2

 

An overview of research issues related to drug addiction is presented. Behavioral neurochemical and pharmacological mechanisms involved in the actions of major classes of abused drugs will be discussed. The course will be taught in a combined lecture/seminar format with faculty presentation of lectures and student-led discussion of research publications related to the lecture topic.

 

Dr. Stanley Glick, Dr. Jeffrey Carlson

 

NEU 615/

Neuropharmacology and Behavioral Neuroscience

Credits: 3

 

This course focuses on synaptic mechanisms involved in drug and chemical actions, and on their behavioral effects. Topics include autonomic and neurochemical effects of drugs; the effects of drugs on arousal, motivation, learning and memory; drugs as incentives (addiction); hallucinogenic drugs, and the role of drugs in treating mental and neurologic disorders.

 

Dr. Jeffrey Carlson, Dr. Stanley Glick

 

NEU 617/

Molecular Basis for Neurodegeneration and Neuroprotection in Stroke and Ischemia

Credits: 2

 

This course focuses on the molecular basis for neurodegeneration and neuroprotection in Stroke and Ischemia.  Some of the topics addressed include cerebrovascular blood flow, mechanisms of damage, and clinical aspects of stroke.  The course is taught in a combined lecture/seminar format with lectures by faculty and student-led discussion of research papers.

 

Dr. Alexander Mongin, Dr. Richard Keller

 

NEU 618/

Neurophysiology

Credits: 2

 

This course provides an overview on the fundamentals of electrical signaling in excitable cells. The objective of the course is to provide students with tools to understand and critically evaluate electrophysiology work. Levels of analysis presented range from membrane and ion channel biophysics to systems and behavioral electrophysiology. Lectures focus on current electrophysiological techniques, and representative articles are discussed. In addition, each student participates in two full laboratory sessions.

 

Dr. Mark Fleck

 

NEU 620/

Tutorial in Neuropharmacology & Neuroscience

Credits: 1-3

 

This course provides the opportunity for any faculty member and student or group of students to undertake supervised advanced study in an area of neuropharmacology and/or neuroscience outside the area of the student's thesis research.

 

To be Arranged

 

 

Requirements for the M.S. Degree
Students in the M.S. program are required to take a minimum of 19 hours of course work and 20 hours of research in order to complete the degree requirements. Course work is generally completed by the end of the second year of the program. A committee to oversee the thesis project should be selected during the second year. The M.S. program normally takes 2 - 3 years of study. All full-time students must be registered for a minimum of 10 credits per semester.

M.S. Program

 

Year 1, Fall Semester

AMC 500/

Biochemistry: Protein Dynamics, Membranes and Cellular Energetics

Credits: 4

 

This course will provide the foundation of modern biochemistry on proteins dynamics, enzymology, membrane biochemistry and cellular energetics required for topical areas in biochemistry presented in the Spring. A particular focus will be the state-of-the art of biochemistry that has arisen from the techniques of molecular biology. Topical areas to be covered protein folding, protein-protein interaction, drug -receptor interactions, allosterism, protein turnover, membrane assembly, and metabolic flux as related to bioenergetics. Co-taught with the State University of New York at Albany School of Public Health. Semester: Fall; All first year students must take this course.

 

Dr. Kathy Herrick-Davis, Dr. Terry Wagenknecht

 

AMC 502/

Research Topics in the Biomedical Sciences

Credits: 1

 

This literature based colloquium will introduce students to the current research in the biomedical sciences with an emphasis on the interdisciplinary research programs at AMC. This course will involve student presentations and round table discussions in topical areas that are being covered in AMC 500 and AMC 505. All first year students must take this course.

 

Dr. Mark Fleck

 

AMC 505/

Molecular Cell Biology: Molecular Genetics, Information Flow & Transmembrane - Signaling

Credits: 4

 

A foundation in molecular cell biology will be provided with an emphasis on model genetic systems, transcription, protein synthesis, structural cell biology and cellular signaling. This course will lay the foundation for topical areas found in each Interdisciplinary Research Center Spring Flagship courses: IMD 608: Immunology; IMD 609: Microbial Disease; CBCR 603: Signal Transduction; and CBCR 604: Tissue Remodeling & Cell Motility, NEU 606: Cellular & Molecular Neuroscience, NEU 607: Fundamentals of Pharmacology, CS 608: Cardiovascular Physiology and CS 609: Respiratory & Renal Physiology. This course is co-taught with the State University of New York at Albany School of Public Health. All first year students must take this course.

 

Dr. Susan LaFlamme, Dr. Robert Glaser

 

AMC 507/

Introduction to Scientific Integrity

Credits: 0

 

Students attend a total of four class meetings and participate in discussions. Short readings will be assigned. Sessions will address current issues in scientific integrity, ethical principles and theory, introduction to ethics case analysis, and an ethical skills workshop. At the end of this course students will have a basic appreciation of ethical principles in relation to standards of professional conduct in science. Students will also develop their confidence in their ability to analyze and discuss ethical and professional standards as they apply to specific aspects of scientific research. This course is required of all first year students.

 

Dr. John Kaplan , Dr. Wayne Shelton

 

NEU 502/

Neuroscience Journal Club

Credits: 1

 

This course is designed to teach students how to read and criticize current literature, and to help students learn how to communicate scientifically. Student presentations and participation are an integral part of this course. Center for Neuropharmacology & Neuroscience Students, faculty and post-doctoral fellows will make presentations on their own research or critically evaluate a journal article of broad scientific interest. Participation is an integral part of this course. Students are required to register for this course every semester that they are fully matriculated.

 

Dr. Mark Fleck

 

NEU 504 A/

Research Rotations

Credits: 1 each

 

Research laboratory rotations of 10-12 weeks (including a 2-5 page report)are to be completed during the first year of study. Ph.D. students are required to complete three rotations in different laboratories as a prerequisite to selecting a mentor. Masters of Science students must complete two rotations prior to selecting a mentor.

 

Faculty

 

Year 1, Spring Semester

NEU 502/

Neuroscience Journal Club

Credits: 1

 

This course is designed to teach students how to read and criticize current literature, and to help students learn how to communicate scientifically. Student presentations and participation are an integral part of this course. Center for Neuropharmacology & Neuroscience Students, faculty and post-doctoral fellows will make presentations on their own research or critically evaluate a journal article of broad scientific interest. Participation is an integral part of this course. Students are required to register for this course every semester that they are fully matriculated.

 

Dr. Mark Fleck

 

NEU 503/

Selected Topics in Neuroscience

Credits: 1

 

This course is designed to teach students how to present their work effectively. The course is comprised of our general seminar program of invited speakers as well as seminars presented by our students. It provides the opportunity to hear the latest research progress in a number of pertinent areas, to see how experienced researchers present their data, and to give students experience in presenting their own data. Students also meet as a group to review and discuss all student presentations. While the course runs during both the Fall and Spring semesters, each student presents their research only once and all students register for the course only in the Spring semester.

 

Dr. Richard Keller, Dr. Lauren Jacobson

 

NEU 504 B/

Research Rotation

Credits: 1

 

Research laboratory rotations of 10-12 weeks (including a 2-5 page report)are to be completed during the first year of study. Ph.D. students are required to complete three rotations in different laboratories as a prerequisite to selecting a mentor. Masters of Science students must complete two rotations prior to selecting a mentor.

 

Faculty

 

NEU 606/

Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Credits: 3

 

The material presented will provide an overview of the nervous system including the specialized structures of neurons and glia in relation to their functions. The two major areas of rapid cellular communication in the nervous system, conduction of electrical impulses along axons and chemical neurotransmission at synapses, will be covered in depth. Representative neurotransmitter systems will be discussed in detail, including their function, developmental neurobiology and the cellular basis of learning and memory in simple neuronal systems will be presented.

 

Dr. Richard Keller , Dr. Allan Schneider

 

Year 2 and 3, Fall Semester

NEU 501/

Research

Credits: To be Arranged

 

These credits are earned during thesis research in the laboratory. The number of credits is determined by the mentor.

 

Faculty

 

NEU 502/

Neuroscience Journal Club

Credits: 1

 

This course is designed to teach students how to read and criticize current literature, and to help students learn how to communicate scientifically. Student presentations and participation are an integral part of this course. Center for Neuropharmacology & Neuroscience Students, faculty and post-doctoral fellows will make presentations on their own research or critically evaluate a journal article of broad scientific interest. Participation is an integral part of this course. Students are required to register for this course every semester that they are fully matriculated.

 

Dr. Mark Fleck

 

NEU 6xx/

ELECTIVES (see choices below)

Credits: Variable

 

Faculty

 

 

 

Year 2 and 3, Spring Semester

NEU 501/

Research

Credits: To be Arranged

 

These credits are earned during thesis research in the laboratory. The number of credits is determined by the mentor.

 

Faculty

 

NEU 502/

Neuroscience Journal Club

Credits: 1

 

This course is designed to teach students how to read and criticize current literature, and to help students learn how to communicate scientifically. Student presentations and participation are an integral part of this course. Center for Neuropharmacology & Neuroscience Students, faculty and post-doctoral fellows will make presentations on their own research or critically evaluate a journal article of broad scientific interest. Participation is an integral part of this course. Students are required to register for this course every semester that they are fully matriculated.

 

Dr. Mark Fleck

 

NEU 503/

Selected Topics in Neuroscience

Credits: 1

 

This course is designed to teach students how to present their work effectively. The course is comprised of our general seminar program of invited speakers as well as seminars presented by our students. It provides the opportunity to hear the latest research progress in a number of pertinent areas, to see how experienced researchers present their data, and to give students experience in presenting their own data. Students also meet as a group to review and discuss all student presentations. While the course runs during both the Fall and Spring semesters, each student presents their research only once and all students register for the course only in the Spring semester.

 

Dr. Richard Keller, Dr. Lauren Jacobson

 

NEU 608/

Biostatistics

Credits: 3

 

This is a course in basic biostatistics, which includes lectures on the mathematics necessary to understand statistical analysis. Integral to the course are instructions for proper experimental design and the appropriate use of statistical tests.

 

Dr. Jeffrey Carlson

 

NEU 6xx/

ELECTIVES (see choices below)

Credits: Variable

   Faculty
 

 

 

Electives

NEU 605L/

Neuroanatomy Laboratory

Credits: 1

 

The purpose of this course is to provide the student who is enrolled in NEU 605 (Neuroanatomy & Nervous System Disorders) with lab exercises designed to reinforce and enhance understanding of the gross and histological anatomy of the human nervous system through hands-on demonstration and dissection. Each class will consist of a brief introduction followed by text-guided laboratory in which students work in small groups with faculty assistance. Students will utilize preserved human brain and spinal cord material, sheep brains, plastic-embedded brain sections, models, atlases and online resources. A second purpose is to provide the student with training for their future as educators of medical and allied health students. ***Must be currently enrolled in NEU 605 (BMS 612) or have completed it with a grade of C or better.

 

Dr. Tara Lindsley

 

NEU 607/

Fundamentals of Pharmacology

Credits: 2

   Dr. Lindsay Hough
 

 

 

NEU 612/

Developmental Neuroscience

Credits: 2

 

This course focuses on cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the development of the central and peripheral nervous system. Lecture topics include neural induction, histogenesis, neuron migration, axon guidance, synaptogenesis and apoptosis. Also included are lectures on the modification of synaptic connections in development and regeneration, coordination of neural development with organogenesis, and the use of genetically modified animal models to probe gene function. In addition, students read and discuss article representative of current research on each lecture topic.

 

Dr. Sally Temple , Dr. Tara Lindsley

 

NEU 613/

Receptor Pharmacology

Credits: 2

 

The course will cover the molecular biology and pharmacology of receptors. Introductory material will include an in-depth approach to the molecular dynamics of the ligand-receptor interaction. This will be followed by lectures on the three major families of receptors: the G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), the tyrosine kinase receptors (TK), and the ligand-gated ion channel receptors. Graduate level biochemistry is a prerequisite.

 

Dr. Milt Teitler

 

NEU 614/

The Biology of Addiction

Credits: 2

 

An overview of research issues related to drug addiction is presented. Behavioral neurochemical and pharmacological mechanisms involved in the actions of major classes of abused drugs will be discussed. The course will be taught in a combined lecture/seminar format with faculty presentation of lectures and student-led discussion of research publications related to the lecture topic.

 

Dr. Stanley Glick , Dr. Jeffrey Carlson

 

NEU 615/

Neuropharmacology and Behavioral Neuroscience

Credits: 3

 

This course focuses on synaptic mechanisms involved in drug and chemical actions, and on their behavioral effects. Topics include autonomic and neurochemical effects of drugs; the effects of drugs on arousal, motivation, learning and memory; drugs as incentives (addiction); hallucinogenic drugs, and the role of drugs in treating mental and neurologic disorders.

 

Dr. Jeffrey Carlson , Dr. Stanley Glick

 

NEU 617/

Molecular Basis for Neurodegeneration and Neuroprotection in Stroke and Ischemia

Credits: 2

 

This course focuses on the molecular basis for neurodegeneration and neuroprotection in Stroke and Ischemia.  Some of the topics addressed include cerebrovascular blood flow, mechanisms of damage, and clinical aspects of stroke.  The course is taught in a combined lecture/seminar format with lectures by faculty and student-led discussion of research papers.

 

Dr. Alexander Mongin, Dr. Richard Keller

 

NEU 618/

Neurophysiology

Credits: 2

 

This course provides an overview on the fundamentals of electrical signaling in excitable cells. The objective of the course is to provide students with tools to understand and critically evaluate electrophysiology work. Levels of analysis presented range from membrane and ion channel biophysics to systems and behavioral electrophysiology. Lectures focus on current electrophysiological techniques, and representative articles are discussed. In addition, each student participates in two full laboratory sessions.

 

Dr. Mark Fleck

 

NEU 620/

Tutorial in Neuropharmacology & Neuroscience

Credits: 1-3

 

This course provides the opportunity for any faculty member and student or group of students to undertake supervised advanced study in an area of neuropharmacology and/or neuroscience outside the area of the student's thesis research.

 

To be Arranged