Albany Medical Center
 Search
Home / Caring / Educating / Discovering / Find a Doctor / News / Give Now / Careers / About / Calendar / Directions / Contact
College Phone Directory Maps & Directions

INDIVIDUAL RESEARCHER

Dale D. Tang , M.D. , Ph.D.
Professor
e-mail: tangd@mail.amc.edu

Phone: 518-262-6416

Education

- Ph.D. from Tonji Medical University, Wuhan, China
- M.D. from Tonji Medical University, Wuhan, China


Current Research

View the Cytoarchitecture of Smooth Muscle Cells

Our laboratory is focusing on cytoskeletal regulation of cell functions. The cytoskeleton is a network of fibers throughout in the cytoplasm that helps the cell to maintain its shape, and provides support to the cells. The cytoskeleton undergoes remodeling in response to external stimulation, which has been implicated in regulating a variety of cellular functions including cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, trafficking, mitosis and contraction. But, the mechanisms underlying these processes are not well understood.  

There are three cytoskeletal systems in the cell: the actin cytoskeleton, the intermediate filament network and microtubules. Our group is largely working on the first two systems. But, if we have talented postdoctoral fellows or students to join, we may also assess the role and mechanism of microtubules in cells.

Currently, we are determining the role and mechanism of cytoskeleton-associated proteins in smooth muscle. Smooth muscle is a key component of the airways and blood vessels, which plays an essential role in regulating functions of respiratory and cardiovascular systems. Specifically, we are determining the functional role of a non-receptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl, the adapter protein Abi and actin-associated protein GMF in smooth muscle contraction, cell proliferation, and migration using in vitro cell culture models. In addition, we are also using animal models to assess the role of c-Abl in the development of smooth muscle diseases such as asthma and hypertension.

 To accomplish our goals, we are using state-of-art technologies such as gene cloning, gene mutation, gene transfer, protein biochemistry, cell biology, tissue biology, gene knockout mice and animal models of disease.

Currently we are funded by two NIH grants, which provide a unique opportunity for postdoctoral fellows and students to receive the first-class biomedical research training. Thus, we have openings for the postdoctoral fellows/students in the laboratory. If interested, please send your application to Dale D. Tang at tangd@mail.amc.edu

 



Research Interests

Cytoskeletal regulation of smooth muscle functions, pathogenesis of asthma and hypertension



PubMed Publications

  1. Wang, T., Cleary, R. A., Wang, R., and Tang, D. D. Role of the adapter protein Abi1 in actin-associated signaling and smooth muscle contraction. J Biol Chem. 288: 20713-20722, ePub June 5, 2013.



References

  1. Li Q-F, Spinelli AM, Wang R. Anfinoginova Y, Singer, HA and Tang DD. Critical role of vimentin phosphorylation at Ser-56 by p21-activated kinase in vimentin cytoskeleton signaling. J Biol Chem. 281 (45): 34716-34724, 2006. ePub September 20, 2006


  2. Anfinogenova Y, Wang R, Li Q-F, Spinelli AM and Tang DD. Abl silencing inhibits CAS mediated process and constriction in resistance arteries. Circ Res 101(4): 420-428, 2007.


  3. Tang, DD. Invited Review: Intermediate filaments in smooth muscle. Am J Physiol Cell: 294:C869-C878, 2008


  4. Li, Q.F and Tang, DD. Role of p47(phox) in regulating Cdc42GAP, vimentin, and contraction in smooth muscle cells. Am J Physiol Cell Physiology, ePub, 10/7/2009, 297: C1424-C1433, 2009


  5. Jia L and Tang, DD. Abl activation regulates the dissociation of CAS from cytoskeletal vimentin by affecting CAS phosphorylaiton in smooth muscle. Am J Physiol Cell Physiology, 299: C630-637, 2010 (ePub, 7/7/2010)


  6. Jia L, Wang RP and Tang, DD. Abl regulates smooth muscle cell proliferation by modulating actin dynamics and ERK1/2 activation