Home | Directions | Find a Job | News | Lifeline | Video | Choose a Department

Chronic Kidney Disease           

Chronic Kidney Disease

At Albany Med, we are leading the way in treating patients with chronic kidney disease.

Chronic Kidney Disease

Chronic Kidney Disease


According to the National Kidney Foundation, 26 million Americans have kidney disease and millions more are at an increased risk.

Recent evidence indicates that earlier stages of chronic kidney disease can be detected by laboratory testing and early therapeutic interventions can help slow or prevent the progression toward kidney failure and associated complications.

At Albany Medical Center, we are committed to providing comprehensive care to patients with kidney disease by bringing a team of specialists together to develop treatment plans and engage patients in their ongoing care.

About Chronic Kidney Disease

Chronic kidney disease (CKD), also known as chronic renal disease, is a progressive loss in renal function over a period of months or years. Often, chronic kidney disease is diagnosed as a result of screening of people known to be at risk of kidney problems, such as those with high blood pressure or diabetes and those with a blood relative with chronic kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease may also be identified when it leads to one of its recognized complications, such as cardiovascular disease, anemia or pericarditis.

Chronic kidney disease is identified by a blood test for creatinine. Higher levels of creatinine indicate a falling glomerular filtration rate, and as a result a decreased capability of the kidneys to excrete waste products. Creatinine levels may be normal in the early stages of chronic kidney disease, and the condition is discovered if a urinalysis shows that the kidney is allowing the loss of protein or red blood cells into the urine.

To better understand the underlying cause of kidney damage, various forms of medical imaging, blood tests and often renal biopsy (removing a small sample of kidney tissue) may be completed to determine if the cause for kidney malfunction is reversible.  
Kidney disease can cause serious complications including high blood pressure, anemia, weak bones, nerve damage and even heart disease.  If kidney disease worsens, it may lead to end stage renal disease and kidney failure, requiring dialysis or kidney transplant.