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Schaffer Library of Health Sciences

Vander Veer, Huested & Rippey


Dr VanderVeer Albert Vander Veer, M.D.
Surgeon, 66th N.Y. Volunteers
Surgeon, First Division Hospital, Second Army Corps
Surgeon, Army of the Potomac
Photo: date unknown

Albert Vander Veer left Albany Medical College before graduating, became a Medical Cadet in the Army in 1861 (one of the original 100) and served during the Civil War from start to finish. He received his degree from Columbian College in D.C. (now George Washington University) in 1863. In addition to acting as surgeon for the 66th N.Y. Volunteers, and the First Division Hospital, Second Army Corps, he had the duty of locating hospital supplies and was in charge of building winter quarters. He was with the Army of the Potomac when General Lee surrendered to General Grant at the Appomattox Court House in Virginia. After the war, he returned to Albany and served as a faculty member and then Dean of Albany Medical College from 1896 to 1903. On the last page of notes for a Civil War speech he wrote:

"My talk is supposed to be more particularly regarding Army Hospitals ... though Miss Nightengale had done so much in the Crimean War, ten years previous, it had not yet percolated into the official circles of the Army as to field hospitals and nursing. We were not prepared."

For more on Dr. Vander Veer, see the "Albany and the Civil War" exhibit at the Albany Institute of History and Art, running from September 3, 2011 through February 26, 2012.

 

Dr. Huested Alfred B. Huested, M.D.
Class of 1862
Assistant Surgeon, 21 N.Y. Volunteer Cavalry
Photo: date unknown

While in the field, Dr. Huested wrote letters to his Aunt, who had raised him after his father died. Three of those letters are in the AMC Archives. In this letter, written from Cumberland, M.D. on October 2, 1864, he shares his hopes for an end to the war:

"My hopes are much stronger now for the speedy close of the war than they ever were before ... the late victories of Sherman, Sheridan, and the advantages gained by Grant cannot but dishearten and weaken the Rebels very much. If the men at home do their duty and put Abraham in the presidential chair again (and I think they will) it will put a stop to the war in a short time."

 

Dr. Rippey and his Wife John N. Rippey, M.D.
Class of 1862
Assistant Surgeon, 31 N.Y. Volunteers
Assistant Surgeon, 1st N.Y. Volunteer Cavalry

This photograph was taken on December 21, 1864, the day of Dr. Rippey's marriage to Anna Mackay. Dr. Rippey enlisted in the army after graduation and served until the end of the war. He was present at the battles of Chancellorsville and Fredericksburg.



Civil War Medicine    Surgeon Generals, S.N.Y.