Albany Medical Center
 Search
Home / Caring / Educating / Discovering / Find a Doctor / News / Give Now / Careers / About / Calendar / Directions / Contact
Viewing by month: September 2013
September 26, 2013 | Posted By Paul Burcher, MD, PhD

Many of my obstetrical colleagues groan when a patient presents a birth plan during prenatal care, but I do not.  I see it as an opportunity to do what Frank Chervenak and Laurence McCullough have called “preventive ethics”—avoiding conflict later by addressing issues before problems arise.  Prenatal care is unique in medicine in that we spend so much time with generally healthy patients seeking to prevent medical complications that, if they arise at all, are likely to arise much later during labor.  The same mindset that propels and justifies prenatal care should direct our response to birth plans:  this is an opportunity to prevent problems, and misunderstandings during labor, and the fact that the patient has well-formed opinions about what kind of care she wishes to receive during labor means she is engaged and seeking to educate herself.  In short, women presenting with birth plans are generally our most conscientious and informed patients.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

September 24, 2013 | Posted By Jane Jankowski, LMSW, MS

At a Labor Day party earlier this month, I was among the lucky guests filling a plate with an array of tasty picnic food ranging from the traditional cook out items to exotic salads and fruits, all washed down with a blueberry martini. (NO, I do not have the recipe.) Food represents many things in our culture and expresses values in subtle ways – and not so subtle ways. Bidding farewell to summer and enjoying the blessings of some great local produce, I noted that the centerpiece of my meal was a thick grilled hamburger.  Unless otherwise stated, it is presumed to be made of beef. And I had to wonder: will burgers like this one become scarce in my lifetime? With the recent production of meat grown from bovine stem cells, there is speculation that lab-grown meat product will someday replace animal meat as a primary food source. It seems important to consider what is, um, at stake for consumers, for science, and the evolving culture of lab grown food.

As for this new use of stem cell technology, I think we need to question whether or not this was the best use of resources. At  an estimated cost of over $300k, it was terribly expensive to create, but many new technologies come at a price. This Petri dish patty was reported to not taste very good, a shortcoming blamed on the absence of fat in this manufactured patty. However, it was deemed safe to eat and as far as I know, none of the taste testers became ill from ingesting the “schmeat.” Engineered beef might find a welcome in areas where there is mistrust about food safety and where food supply for meat products is limited. Yet, refrigeration needs may still prove a formidable barrier even if cost of manufacture and shipping could be assured. 

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

September 19, 2013 | Posted By Wayne Shelton, PhD

When ethics and humanities were first introduced into the first few medical curricula in the early 1970’s, there was considerable optimism about how the exposure to ethics and humanities could “humanize” young physicians and positively affect their practice habits. Learning about the humanistic areas of medicine from trained experts, sometimes referred to as “humanists”, was perhaps naively assumed to be somewhat of an antidote to the effects of the growing medical industrial complex that had become evident to many. Although we take for granted the place of ethics and humanities in most medical school curricula today, those of us who teach in these areas forget that the1970’s were not that long ago and that we are still learning the ropes of how to integrate our efforts into the medical culture. The field has matured as evidenced in the transition from the early naivety regarding the potential impact of knowledge and ideas presented in the abstract versus the realization of how knowledge and ideas are learned, and indeed embodied, in clinical practice; this growing understanding of the factors at work in medical education also parallels the growth and development of educators in ethics and humanities, who by the 1990’s had become entrenched in the mainstream of U.S. medical centers. Many of these same ethics and humanities faculty had made a huge transition from being isolated in an academic area like philosophy to being deeply involved in the hospital clinical setting.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

September 17, 2013 | Posted By Lisa Campo-Engelstein, PhD

Testicular tissue cryopreservation is a neglected topic in the fields of fertility preservation and bioethics not only because reproduction is usually associated with women and girls, but also because sperm banking is an established, easy, and cheap method that works for the majority of male cancer patients. However, norms surrounding fatherhood are changing, with more men interested in active fatherhood, and consequently fertility preservation is becoming and will continue to become increasingly important to male cancer patients.

When compared to the number of studies demonstrating the importance of fertility to female cancer patients, the literature focusing on male cancer patients’ perspectives on fertility is minimal. However, there are more researchers examining the latter topic today than in the past. Contemporary research on gendered perspectives on fertility preservation reveals a shift over time: although older studies generally found that female cancer patients value their fertility

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

September 13, 2013 | Posted By John Kaplan, PhD

Today one can read the news media and regularly encounter stories about research misconduct and other questionable conduct by researchers. Having spent a career as a researcher and research ethicist I seldom see reports which shock me. There are millions of researchers making millions of research reports and these things happen. However the story of two neurosurgeons from the University of California at Davis School of Medicine was so egregious that it shocked even me.  Dr. J. Paul Muizelaar and Dr. Rudolph J. Schot so blatantly disregarded the ethical underpinnings for the conduct of research on human subjects that their only defense was that their actions did not constitute research. Much of my information on this incident comes from the excellent articles reported by Marjie Lundstrom of the Sacramento Bee as well as the insights of their editorial staff.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

September 9, 2013 | Posted By Marleen Eijkholt, PhD

Sarah is 10 years old and has cancer. She has lymphoblastic lymphoma, an aggressive form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. News reports suggest that her parents and Sarah herself, decided to stop chemo treatment. “Sarah’s father said she begged her parents to stop the chemotherapy and they agreed after a great deal of prayer”. Sarah and her family are Amish. Reports note that they refused chemobecause the side effects made Sarah horribly sick, and that she was worried about losing her fertility. They decided to use a doctor who would attempt to treat the cancer with natural medicines, like herbs and vitamins. 

Over the last couple of days, their court battle has been outlined in the media. The hospital, where Sarah had been treated with chemotherapy, had applied for limited guardianship.  Guardianship would allow them to ‘force’ chemo therapy on her, particularly as they estimated her chance of long-term survival around 85% after treatment. Initially, this guardianship request was refused on grounds that it was the parents’ right to end treatment, while on appeal the judge ruled her best-interest had to be reconsidered. However, the most recent judgment reasoned that the parents were concerned and informed, that they have a right to decide about treatment for their child, that there was no guarantee for success of the chemo, and that guardianship & treatment would go against the girl’s wishes as it could cause her infertility. Guardianship was refused; Sarah’s health is governed by her parents.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

September 5, 2013 | Posted By Bruce D. White, DO, JD

At a conference a few days ago I sat beside a former deputy commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). We were in a small group that was discussing the need to help interested parties in Brazil, China, and India learn more about US drug regulatory affairs and compendial science. As best I could understand, the food and drug regulatory infrastructure in China and India appears to be much the same as it was in the US around the 1930s and 1940s. However, everyone agreed that China and India have some of the best medicinal chemists, pharmaceutical formulations engineers, and pharmacy plant manufacturing and pharmacokinetics specialists in the world.

During the conversation I learned that the vast majority of the world’s commercially available antibiotic products are manufactured in China and India. This information struck me as a shock! Until then, I had been under the impression that when the last antibiotic manufacturing plant closed in the US in 2004 and the industry moved off-shore, that the companies had gone to Puerto Rico and Europe. But China and India?

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

SEARCH BIOETHICS TODAY
SUBSCRIBE TO BIOETHICS TODAY
ABOUT BIOETHICS TODAY
BIOETHICS TODAY is the blog of the Alden March Bioethics Institute, presenting topical and timely commentary on issues, trends, and breaking news in the broad arena of bioethics. BIOETHICS TODAY presents interviews, opinion pieces, and ongoing articles on health care policy, end-of-life decision making, emerging issues in genetics and genomics, procreative liberty and reproductive health, ethics in clinical trials, medicine and the media, distributive justice and health care delivery in developing nations, and the intersection of environmental conservation and bioethics.
TOPICS