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Viewing by month: October 2012
October 3, 2012 | Posted By Bruce White, DO, JD

The September 20, 2012, issue of The New England Journal of Medicine carried two Sounding Board pieces about recommendations to contain health care spending. One article is titled “A Systematic Approach to Containing Health Care Spending” was produced by nationally known health policy experts working in cooperation with the Center for American Progress.

About half of the 11 recommended solutions are not new, nor have they proven to be anything more than platitudes from the past. Among these recommendations are: (a) “accelerate use of alternatives to fee-for-service payment”; (b) “simplify administrative systems for all payers and providers”; (c) “make better use of nonphysician providers [such as nurse practitioners and physicians assistants]”; (d) “expand the Medicare ban on physician self-referrals”; and (e) “reduce the costs of defensive medicine.” Should one peruse any one of several books produced in the 1980s written by politicians and health system gurus – such as Alain C. Enthoven’s Health Plan (1980), Joseph A. Califano, Jr.’s America’s Health Care Revolution (1986), Victor R. Fuch’s The Health Economy (1986), and Rashi Fein’s Medical Care, Medical Costs (1989) – they would find the same recommendations. Also, not so curiously, all of these authors and many others agreed in spirit – in the 1980s – that health care spending “trends [then] could squeeze out critical investments in education and infrastructure, contribute to unsustainable debt levels, and constrain wage increases for the middle class.” This at a time when total health care spending was one-tenth of what it is today (health care spending in 1980 was $256 billon; health care spending in 2020 was $2.6 trillion).

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

October 1, 2012 | Posted By Ricki Lewis, PhD

On July 11, Wills Eye Institute ophthalmologist Carl Regillo delicately placed 100,000 cells beneath the retina of 52-year-old Maurie Hill’s left eye. She was rapidly losing her vision due to Stargardt disease, an inherited macular dystrophy similar to the much more common dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

Maurie’s disease was far along, the normally lush forests of photoreceptor cells in the central macula area severely depleted, especially the cones that provide color vision. Would the introduced cells nestle among the ragged remnants of her retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and take over, restoring the strangled energy supply to her remaining photoreceptors? They should, for the cells placed in Maurie’s eye weren’t ordinary cells. They were derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs).

I’ve waited 15 years to see human embryonic stem cells, or their “daughter” cells, make their way through clinical trials. And thanks to Maurie’s sharing her story, I’m witnessing translational medicine.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

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BIOETHICS TODAY is the blog of the Alden March Bioethics Institute, presenting topical and timely commentary on issues, trends, and breaking news in the broad arena of bioethics. BIOETHICS TODAY presents interviews, opinion pieces, and ongoing articles on health care policy, end-of-life decision making, emerging issues in genetics and genomics, procreative liberty and reproductive health, ethics in clinical trials, medicine and the media, distributive justice and health care delivery in developing nations, and the intersection of environmental conservation and bioethics.
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