Albany Medical Center
 Search
Home / Caring / Educating / Find a Doctor / News / Give Now / Careers / About / Calendar / Directions / Contact
Topic: Reproductive Medicine
September 17, 2013 | Posted By Lisa Campo-Engelstein, PhD

Testicular tissue cryopreservation is a neglected topic in the fields of fertility preservation and bioethics not only because reproduction is usually associated with women and girls, but also because sperm banking is an established, easy, and cheap method that works for the majority of male cancer patients. However, norms surrounding fatherhood are changing, with more men interested in active fatherhood, and consequently fertility preservation is becoming and will continue to become increasingly important to male cancer patients.

When compared to the number of studies demonstrating the importance of fertility to female cancer patients, the literature focusing on male cancer patients’ perspectives on fertility is minimal. However, there are more researchers examining the latter topic today than in the past. Contemporary research on gendered perspectives on fertility preservation reveals a shift over time: although older studies generally found that female cancer patients value their fertility

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

August 23, 2013 | Posted By Lisa Campo-Engelstein, PhD

Unlike organs, the U.S. allows gametes to be purchased. Given this dichotomy between the legal treatment of gametes and the legal treatment of organs, the question then arises: how should we legally classify ovaries, which can be used to treat both reproductive conditions (infertility) and non-reproductive conditions (premature menopause)?  

I believe ovarian tissue should be aligned with gametes rather than organs. I recognize that this leads to concerns about the sale of ovarian tissue (e.g., price, access, limitations, etc.). However, ovarian tissue like gametes and unlike other types of transplant, can lead to pregnancy, a socially and ethically important difference. The potential to create a new life is significant because new life often engenders new relationships and legal responsibilities. Whereas organ donors, both living and cadaveric, can remain anonymous, gamete donors typically cannot, at least not fully anonymous. Gamete donors are generally required to provide personal information on a variety of topics, such as physical characteristics, family medical history, religion, personal achievements, and personality traits. Potential recipients (and fertility centers) are usually the only ones who have access to this personal information. 

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

July 25, 2013 | Posted By Benita Zahn, MS

The law in the United States is clear that once a person has completed their prison sentence and parole they are free to go on and live their lives. The state does not have continued control over them. While some might argue that for sex offenders and regulations regarding where they may live impinges on this, that narrow issue is not the focus of this paper. I will argue that castration, chemical or physical, is antithetical to our society. 

The eighth amendment prohibits cruel and unusual punishment. Mutilation would be considered cruel and unusual punishment and castration clearly falls under that banner. It involves a surgical procedure to remove the testicles or in women, the removal of their ovaries. One need to look no further than to realize physical castration to control sexual predators should not be permitted.    

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

July 15, 2013 | Posted By Lisa Campo-Engelstein, PhD

Despite the fact that fertilization requires mutual, active participation by both eggs and sperm, gender roles are often projected onto reproductive biology, leading to the portrayal of eggs as passive and sperm as active. For example, the opening credits in the 1989 movie Look Who’s Talking portray a common perception of fertilization. As the Beach Boys’ song “I Get Around” plays in the background, we see sperm inside a women’s reproductive tract moving toward her egg. The scene is narrated by one of the sperm, though we can hear some of the other sperm talking. The narrating sperm tells the others, “Ok, follow me … I know where we’re going … I’ve got the map. Follow me kids, keep up.” Upon seeing the egg, the sperm says “I think I see something … this is it, this is definitely it … jackpot!” to which another sperm relies “Yee haw!” We then see a bunch of sperm on the outside of the egg, seeking entrance through the egg membrane – a difficult task as evidenced by the lead sperm stating, “kinda tough here.” The egg then envelopes one sperm as it cries “Ohhh, ohh, I’m in, I’m in.” In this scene, the egg is portrayed as passive, merely drifting along waiting to be discovered by the sperm, whereas the sperm is active, strong, and on a mission to reach the egg. 

A colleague and I were interested in seeing if this misperception of fertilization is limited to the media or if it is also seen in scientific writing. We analyzed science textbooks from the middle school to the medical school level to determine if fertilization in human reproduction is described in gender biased language regarding the sentence structure, amount of information provided for female and male processes/parts, and neutrality in describing female and male processes/parts.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

July 5, 2013 | Posted By John Kaplan, PhD

Usually when I write about stupidity in Congress I wait a couple of months before doing it again. However, I cannot help myself. This is low hanging fruit and I have to pick it. This is “truth is stranger than fiction” type of stuff. You cannot make this up. In this blog post I would like to introduce the readers to Representative Michael Clifton Burgess M.D., republican representative from Texas’ 26th Congressional District. Dr. Burgess was born in December 1950. I mention this only because it was the same month I was born. He graduated with a Bachelors of Science from North Texas State University. He graduated from medical school at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. He completed his residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology from Parkland Memorial Hospital in Dallas. He also completed a Masters degree in Medical Management from the University of Texas at Dallas. Dr. Burgess is the founder and chair of the Congressional Health Care Caucus, albeit it’s only member. This all suggests the likelihood that Dr. Burgess is smart. His recent statements seem to refute that likelihood.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

June 17, 2013 | Posted By Lisa Campo-Engelstein, PhD

One of the major concerns with human egg donation is that there is no federal or systematic oversight. The UK has the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) that regulates the use of gametes and embryos for fertility treatment and research. In contrast, the US is the “Wild West” when it comes to reproductive medicine as we lack any real regulation in this field (there are soft policy guidelines from various medical and scientific organizations but these don’t have teeth). 

Without any oversight, many concerns are raised about the screening of donors. For example, women can donate at multiple centers without any of the other centers knowing. There are no good studies on the effects of donating eggs numerous times, but many believe it could be detrimental to women’s health. Another problem with women donating to multiple centers is that if their eggs are to be used for research purposes, it could lead to less diversity in the research sample. If their eggs are being used for reproductive purposes, then there is a greater chance of creating many half-siblings. 

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

May 28, 2013 | Posted By Zubin Master, PhD

For Part I of this blog, I will highlight a new discovery where scientists have now been able to create cloned stem cells and I will review two ethical debates that were central to earlier discourse surrounding stem cell research: (1) the moral status of human embryos and (2) the potential physical and social harms to women as egg providers.

So finally research cloning (a.k.a. therapeutic cloning) has been achieved! The technique is called somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and now has been used to derive human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) (Tachibana et al.Cell 2013). Performing SCNT using human oocytes is an astonishing accomplishment and has significant ethical and clinical implications.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

May 22, 2013 | Posted By Benita Zahn, MS

In their 2012 article "Preserving the Right to Future Children: An ethical Case Analysis" the authors apply a principalist approach to the ethical analysis of a mother’s decision to allow her 2 year old daughter, Daisy, to undergo OTC to preserve her fertility following stem cell transplant to treat her severe Sickle Cell disease.

While this approach gives one clear parameters to make ethical decisions by identifying issues of autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence and justice, it does not adequately provide for the contextual issues surrounding such an emotionally charged decision and thus may miss crucial points.  A narrative ethics approach would better identify the contextual issues and create an environment for those issues to be factored into the decision. 

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

May 15, 2013 | Posted By Tara Bernardino

Mary Shanley argues against anonymous gamete donation on the basis of what she describes as the right of children conceived using donated gametes to “learn the identity of one’s genetic forebear.” Shanley believes this right stems from “some people’s desire to connect themselves to human history concretely as embodied beings…” I challenge Shanley’s viewpoint as being “progeny-centric,” because while it acknowledges the potential desire of the children created from gametes to learn information about the gamete donor, it fails to consider the rights or interests of that donor, both at the time of the donation, and later, when a child exists.  While I agree with Shanley that some children of gamete donors may desire identifying information about the donor, I disagree that those children have a right to access information about the donor beyond that which the donor agreed to provide or which was required at the time of donation such as genetic and medical history.  Instead I would propose a system where anonymity is optional, akin to the policy of open and closed adoption.  This approach recognizes the interests of the donor, respecting their right to privacy and medical confidentiality, while leaving open the possibility for any future children to inquire about their genetic origins and donor information.  

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

April 16, 2013 | Posted By Lisa Campo-Engelstein, PhD

We often hear stories in the media about women (and it is usually women, not men) who are irresponsibly reproducing (e.g. teenage girls, older women, single women, women on welfare, women with addictions, etc.). While determining what counts as responsible reproduction is not always an easy task, one way to do so is by drawing on the principle of nonmaleficence (aka “do no harm”). John Arras and Jeffrey Blustein present this line of thinking in their discussion of what it means to responsibly reproduce: “If one can reasonably be expected to predict that, should a person decide to reproduce, the resulting child’s existence would fall below a certain threshold of acceptable well-being, the person can be blamed for reproducing irresponsibly.” Arras and Blustein enumerate a range of ideas of what counts as being below this threshold from least controversial to most controversial: child abuse and neglect, children born with severe medical conditions, “anything that parents do to lower a child’s potential” (e.g. drinking alcohol during pregnancy), and “parents who do not optimize their child’s potential for a good life” (e.g. genetic enhancement). Regardless of how this threshold is defined, the main idea here is that people should not reproduce if their potential children would be harmed. 

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

SEARCH BIOETHICS TODAY
SUBSCRIBE TO BIOETHICS TODAY
ABOUT BIOETHICS TODAY
BIOETHICS TODAY is the blog of the Alden March Bioethics Institute, presenting topical and timely commentary on issues, trends, and breaking news in the broad arena of bioethics. BIOETHICS TODAY presents interviews, opinion pieces, and ongoing articles on health care policy, end-of-life decision making, emerging issues in genetics and genomics, procreative liberty and reproductive health, ethics in clinical trials, medicine and the media, distributive justice and health care delivery in developing nations, and the intersection of environmental conservation and bioethics.
TOPICS