Topic: Quality of Life
January 4, 2016 | Posted By Valerye Milleson, PhD

"I now know that if you describe things as better as they are, you are considered to be romantic; if you describe things as worse than they are, you are called a realist; and if you describe things exactly as they are, you are called a satirist." – Quentin Crisp

A theme that has run through many of my blog posts so far is the concept of eudaimonia. This New Year, which not only highlights the annual rituals of goal setting and actively plotting to become the best person you can be in the year to come but also is a reminder of the birth of famed raconteur and master of wit, Quentin Crisp, seems to me like the perfect time to discuss this concept in greater detail.

"If I have any talent at all, it is not for doing but for being." – Quentin Crisp

Despite his humble self-description, Quentin Crisp has been a hero to many, and in his vocation of being he was one of the strongest advocates of “living well” in recent times. Living well (or “good spirit”, happiness, human flourishing, etc.) is roughly what ancient Greek philosophers meant by eudaimonia. Aristotle’s definition in the Nicomachean Ethics of “living well and doing well” (Book I, Chapter IV) is apt and fairly uncontroversial; but it is far from self-explanatory. After all, “living well” can mean different things to different people. For Aristotle, living well basically meant living a life of excellence in reason (along with certain external goods necessary to keep this virtuous activity going smoothly). The Stoics agreed with Aristotle’s account on the role of excellence in reason, but disagreed with him about the importance of such things as wealth, family, friends, power, beauty, etc. in one being able to achieve eudaimonia. The Cynics and the Stoics held fairly similar views of eudaimonia, but in general the Cynics seemed to actively disavow these external things, and living well to a Cynic would have been more akin to the life of a virtuous ascetic. The Cynics also tended to be, like Mr. Crisp, satirists, cosmopolitans, and lovers of excellence and humanity.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

October 9, 2015 | Posted By Valerye Milleson, PhD

“People need to be made more aware of the need to work at learning how to live because life is so quick and sometimes it goes away too quickly.” – Andy Warhol

This past weekend was the last one for The Late Drawings of Andy Warhol: 1973-1987 exhibit at The Hyde Collection Museum in Glen Falls, and I almost didn’t go to it. I told myself there were far too many other things to do: the stack of recent journal articles I’ve been meaning to get to; student assignments that are in need of grading; the upcoming presentations for which I haven’t even begun putting together powerpoints; the apartment that, despite ongoing efforts, never seems to be completely clean; the piles of unwashed or unfolded laundry; and so on. In terms of triaging my limited time, a two-hour round trip trek to see a handful of sketches hardly seemed sufficiently important.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

October 2, 2014 | Posted By Jane Jankowski, DPS, LMSW

Who decides when a problem is worthy of clinical attention? Symptoms may prompt individuals to seek medical attention, but part of this recent review of the Prozac revolution (selling-prozac-as-the-life-enhancing-cure-for-mental-woes )in the US suggests that public perception of medication for some problems was launched into a new era when Prozac hit the market in 1987. Truly revolutionary in its ability to target serotonin in order to treat depression, the additional impact of rolling out Prozac was the perhaps unintended consequence of marketing drugs to address issues which enhance people’s daily life.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

May 20, 2013 | Posted By Jane Jankowski, LMSW, MS

Helping individuals with mental retardation maximize their autonomy and enjoy fulfilling quality life experiences is often at the core of ethical arguments surrounding healthcare options for individuals with these disabilities. Having worked with adults with mental retardation I have known some who gave birth, some who got married, and many who were sexually active. There are ranges in function and comprehension in any population group, and the options ought to apply fairly with consideration for the patient’s preferences and best interests guiding decision making. I will argue that in some cases, sterilization promotes autonomy and ought to be considered an option for those with mental retardation as it is for those without any cognitive impairment.  The benefits are the same for person with mental retardation as for any individual – freedom to engage in sexual activity without the risk if unwanted pregnancy. Unlike the old sterilization policies which allowed procedures to be performed over the objections of patients and guardians, this elective procedure may be permissible if an appropriate consent process is in place and engages the patient and his or her support network in the conversation. 

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

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BIOETHICS TODAY is the blog of the Alden March Bioethics Institute, presenting topical and timely commentary on issues, trends, and breaking news in the broad arena of bioethics. BIOETHICS TODAY presents interviews, opinion pieces, and ongoing articles on health care policy, end-of-life decision making, emerging issues in genetics and genomics, procreative liberty and reproductive health, ethics in clinical trials, medicine and the media, distributive justice and health care delivery in developing nations, and the intersection of environmental conservation and bioethics.
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