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Topic: Organ Donation
August 14, 2015 | Posted By Jane Jankowski, DPS, LMSW

Articles about improving organ donation registration rates by targeted social media campaigns have indicated that such efforts can successfully increase the numbers of individuals who elect to become organ donors (Pena, 2014) (Cameron AM, 2013). While it is acknowledged that social medial is a useful medium for generating widespread recognition of the need for organ donation, concerns about whether or not donor registration actually increases donation rates is left unknown. Additional concerns about such registrations meet the standards for informed consent. These are productive conversations, and social media holds tremendous potential for conveying information and generating levels of interest in topics at a ‘viral’ level.

Discussions up to this point seem to focus on donation after death, or in the context of imminent death. What has not been robustly discussed is the role of social media in the role of live organ donation. How should transplant programs view the relationship of acquaintances that begin on social media in the context of seeking information or support related to organ donation? Decisions to donate a solid organ, such as a kidney, ought not to be undertaken lightly, and perhaps the screening process will weed out donors with ambivalent intent or poor understanding of what they have offered a recipient. Given that concerns about informed consent have been noted in prior studies, it seems prudent to exercise added caution when approving donation transactions initiated via social media outlets.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

April 23, 2013 | Posted By Marleen Eijkholt, PhD

Medical situations can instantly change. This can be for the better or for the worse:  A patient who consistently refused to eat, now suddenly decides to eat. A patient who is delirious or manic threatens a staff member at 11:50, but subsequently seems rational and reasonable when we arrive in his room 15 minutes later. A stroke patient who does not communicate or respond, and who is likely to develop into a permanent vegetative state (PVS), perks up, talks and leaves. A patient, who is on the mend, develops a fever, requires a rapid response and dies. 

The ethical issues, similarly, change instantly in these situations. It requires me, as a new clinical ethics, to constantly redefine my perspectives. Where we plan to discuss placement of a feeding tube, the patient’s mood alteration resolves issues around placement and resolves the ethical questions. Where we address concerns around a safe discharge, we find out that the patient’s mood changes at 12 o' clock, and awareness of this time frame allows for a safe discharge. Where have family meetings to discuss quality of life in a PVS, this discussion is no longer necessary as the patient can be discharged.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

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BIOETHICS TODAY is the blog of the Alden March Bioethics Institute, presenting topical and timely commentary on issues, trends, and breaking news in the broad arena of bioethics. BIOETHICS TODAY presents interviews, opinion pieces, and ongoing articles on health care policy, end-of-life decision making, emerging issues in genetics and genomics, procreative liberty and reproductive health, ethics in clinical trials, medicine and the media, distributive justice and health care delivery in developing nations, and the intersection of environmental conservation and bioethics.
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