Topic: Healthcare Business Ethics
November 30, 2015 | Posted By Jane Jankowski, DPS, LMSW

Risk, defined in the dictionary as the “exposure to the chance of injury or loss; a hazard or dangerous chance,”   finds a home in the daily dialogue of bioethics when we weight the consequences of decisions, usually related to healthcare decision making. Environmental factors are not commonly prominent in our discussion of risk considerations – we leave these decisions to the architects and designers who create healthcare spaces. In treatment spaces where deeply personal and intimate life experiences take place, we may need to consider the importance of a multi-stakeholder perspective when new spaces are created or existing spaces are re-designed.

Birth experiences, end of life experiences, and acute crises mark the psyche of patients and families permanently. People come into hospitals with expectations of safe, high quality, accessible care. Birth centers and maternity units increasingly offer family centered care with multiple security measures to assure that newborns, neonates, and family members are as safe and protected as possible. End of life experiences may be enhanced by privacy, increased flexibility in time spent at the patient’s side, physically comfortable surroundings, and appropriate levels of emotional support. Times of acute crisis are less well honored in the physical setting of hospitals, as evidenced in behavioral health care crisis units, which seem to be a lagging priority when it comes to assuring patient centered needs of health and healing are enhanced by environmental considerations.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

October 12, 2012 | Posted By Jane Jankowski, LMSW, MS

A patient walks into her local Emergency Department complaining of back pain. She appears uncomfortable, and states that she was injured in a car accident about a year ago and now has chronic pain in her back. Her x-ray looks normal. She states that her pain is best managed with regular doses of oxycodone, but she ran out and has not been able to see her regular doctor for a refill. She came to the Emergency Department for a prescription instead. Imagine you are the physician. What action would you take?

a. Provide a dose of medication to the patient in the ER to be sure it will be adequate and give the patient a prescription for a couple days’ worth of the requested medication.

b. Call her regular doctor to confirm the medication and dose before providing any medication.

c. Check the state database to be sure this patient is not seeking prescriptions from multiple providers.

d. Offer only non-narcotic pain medications.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

August 29, 2012 | Posted By Bruce D. White, DO, JD

The July 31, 2012, issue of the Chicago Tribune carried an article entitled “Chicago-Based Accretive Health Banned from Doing Business in Minnesota for 2 Years.

Facts in the article are sketchy: (1) The Minnesota attorney general’s office began investigating possible privacy breaches when a hospital account collections company laptop was stolen two years ago. The laptop contained the names and protected health information of 23,000 patients treated at two Minnesota hospitals. (2) The company – Accretive Health – manages billing and collections for hospitals. One hospital in Minnesota accounted for 9.9% of Accretive’s first quarter revenue - $25 million out of $253.7 million.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

SEARCH BIOETHICS TODAY
SUBSCRIBE TO BIOETHICS TODAY
ABOUT BIOETHICS TODAY
BIOETHICS TODAY is the blog of the Alden March Bioethics Institute, presenting topical and timely commentary on issues, trends, and breaking news in the broad arena of bioethics. BIOETHICS TODAY presents interviews, opinion pieces, and ongoing articles on health care policy, end-of-life decision making, emerging issues in genetics and genomics, procreative liberty and reproductive health, ethics in clinical trials, medicine and the media, distributive justice and health care delivery in developing nations, and the intersection of environmental conservation and bioethics.
TOPICS