Albany Medical Center
 Search
Home / Caring / Educating / Find a Doctor / News / Give Now / Careers / About / Calendar / Directions / Contact
Topic: Health Insurance
October 10, 2014 | Posted By John Kaplan, PhD

When the Affordable Care Act, commonly referred to as Obamacare was under consideration there was an unrelenting partisan attack against both the proposed legislation and the president who proposed it. We were told that millions would lose insurance coverage, that the cost of medical care would skyrocket, and that government bureaucrats would be interfering with the health care relationship between us and our physicians. We were told that death panels would be making decisions to end the life of the elderly and infirm. We were told all sorts of things that were so ridiculous that I cannot recall them. The fact is we were told lies. Interestingly and importantly none of these things have occurred. The Affordable Care Act was designed to increase the extent of medical insurance coverage and the corresponding access to health care permitted by insurance coverage. The Affordable Care Act was also designed to slow the growth of health care costs. While it is true that there were initial technical glitches in its rollout, now a year after people could begin to enroll, and still only months after the initiation of most of its provisions it is clearly apparent that it is doing just what it was designed and implemented to do. Yes, the Affordable Care Act, Obamacare, is a success.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website

June 16, 2014 | Posted By Lisa Campo-Engelstein, PhD

In a recent blog, I asserted that assisted reproductive technology (ART) should be a higher priority for the global South because of the severe health, social, and economic effects infertility can have on women there. The most common response to this claim is that resources should first be devoted to treating and preventing life-threatening conditions, such as malaria and HIV/AIDS, rather than conditions that are perceived as merely social and/or psychological. The same response is often used when people suggest that ART should receive higher priority in the global North. Whereas many global North countries provide national health coverage for ART, the US does not. However, there has been movement toward coverage for ART in the US in the last couple of decades and currently 14 states require health insurance companies to cover ART (though there is a wide range of what is covered and under what circumstances). Unfortunately, oncofertility (fertility preservation for cancer patients) is not covered in any of these state laws.

While I understand the argument that limited healthcare resources should be dedicated to the most "pressing" conditions, it is also important to recognize the potential side effects of choosing not to provide coverage for oncofertility and other types of ART. One concern with the lack of coverage for ART is that it reinforces socioeconomic inequalities. The primary users of ART are white, educated, middle- and upper-class not because this group is the most likely to be infertile, but because they are the most likely to be able to afford the high cost of ART out-of-pocket expenses. Cancer patients from lower socioeconomic backgrounds are unlikely to have the large amount of disposable funds (the average cost for one cycle of IVF is around $12,400) for fertility preservation treatment. While “traditional” infertility patients can save their money over a period of time in order to be able to afford ART, cancer patients need to preserve their fertility before their cancer treatment commences and thus they need to be able to immediately provide the cash for fertility preservation treatment in order for it to occur. 

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

June 10, 2014 | Posted By Jane Jankowski, DPS

No one seems to know what the answer is to keeping costs down in healthcare but grand efforts have been undertaken to find someone to blame. Some of the targets are patients, others are providers, and sometimes the insurers are dragged into the fray as well. The rhetoric is tired and worn on both ends.  Is it the folks with chronic diseases like diabetes? Is it the folks who need dialysis? The smokers? The patients who do not follow the doctors’ advice and stay sick and expensive? The people who want ‘everything done’ at the end of life? Is it the doctors who acquiesce to patient demands or the laws that obligate them to do so? Do doctors order too many expensive tests, bleeding insurance system? Is it the liability insurance that must cover them if they fail to order a test? Maybe it is the insurance companies paying high salaries to executives while handing down ever-shrinking reimbursements pressing institutions to find new ways to eek out enough income to sustain an operating budget. Newer to this menu are penalties for staying in the hospital too long and coming back too soon. This latest addition to the list is perhaps among the most absurd.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website. 

April 14, 2014 | Posted By Jane Jankowski, LMSW, MS

A coach is defined as a person who is tasked with teaching or training others, usually in conjunction with athletic endeavors. When this term is applied to health, we often presume the coach is a personal trainer of sorts, focusing on optimizing fitness and nutrition for those who can afford the fee for this level of personal attention. Over the last few years, however, there has been a growing movement to provide a different kind of health coaching within the medical arena for patients who have difficulty adhering to health related regimens for medication, office visits, and management of chronic medical problems. This endeavor has been found to work for many reasons, but remains in the wings of the contemporary healthcare industry.

The first time I read about the concept of community based health coaching was via Atul Gwande’s article “The Hot Spotters” published in 2011 in The New Yorker magazine included here in its entirety for interested readers. What resonated for me was the comment from one recipient who stated that the coach was effective because of the way the advice and encouragement and nudging was delivered, “Because she talks like my mother” implying that there is understanding, concern, and discipline delivered as the underlying message between coach and patient. I think most good athletic coaching is the same. While success is not measured in trophies, medals, or college scholarships when it comes to medical coaching, the potential for life changing outcomes are very real. And the opportunities for cost savings are very real as well.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

February 13, 2014 | Posted By Jane Jankowski, LMSW, MS

During a long cold drive home a couple weeks ago, there was a broadcast on NPR about efforts to help promote the survival of the rare northern spotted owl. The controversy has not centered on the importance of saving the spotted owl, but on whether or not it is ethically acceptable to hunt the barred owl which has moved into territory thereby dangerously threatening the spotted owl population. The barred owl is also an “at risk” species, but has been thriving in the northwestern forests where the spotted owls had fed, bred, and nested.  The government faced a “Sophie’s choice” (Shogran 2014, NPR),  and reluctantly accepted the morally disturbing decision to kill 3600 barred owls in order to try to help the spotted owl maintain a sustainable population.  This distressing environmental dilemma serves as a unique analogy for responsible business decisions related to healthcare. We can turn to business ethics here, which offers the “precautionary principle” (Weber 2001, 134) whereby avoiding harm and meeting the needs of a community requires that if any deleterious action is going to be taken, the proponents of the activity must establish that safety is the intent and there is no other way to accomplish the task than to inflict some degree of harm. Though the cause of reduced numbers of spotted owls and the migration of barred owls is related to man’s stripping timber from the natural habitats of each, the solution needs to balance the competing interests in the existing ecosystem. Similarly, people seeking healthcare in the US are not to blame for the economic woes of our system but it seems compromises from everyone will be needed in order to assure a basic level of service for all.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

December 19, 2013 | Posted By Wayne Shelton, PhD

There are some ominous social and political trends currently in American society on which the field of bioethics should focus more attention. In this informal and admittedly polemical blog, I would like to briefly explore a couple of them.

Governors from about half of the states, mostly from the Tea Party GOP, have invoked their constitutional right to deny healthcare coverage to individuals in their states who make less that 138% of the federal poverty level. These governors calmly claim that pragmatism, not politics, is the basis for their decision to refuse their states the opportunity to participate in the Medicaid expansion program under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). It’s just too costly and the Medicaid program is broken, so they say.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

December 12, 2013 | Posted By Bruce White, DO, JD

A July 28, 2012 article in The New York Times by Anne Lowry and Robert Pear titled “Doctor Shortage Likely to Worsen with Health Law” was recently updated with a follow-up report about Medicaid expansion by Abby Goodnough in a piece titled “Medicaid Growth Could Aggravate Doctor Shortage.” 

Many report that there’s not enough doctors now. It may be curious and rhetorical, but why would anyone suspect that there’s not going to be doctor shortages of some degree – in the very near future – if Medicaid expands by 9 million new persons and the Affordable Care Act (ACA) adds another 30 million or so newly-insured patients to those already covered by some plan. How could this not have been anticipated? It must have been factored into the ACA equation. In the same way that legislators should have realized that some insured would not be able to “keep their coverage” once the new health law was to take effect.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

November 25, 2013 | Posted By Wayne Shelton, PhD

The political right in the U.S. has mounted a formidable effort from the outset to mischaracterize the aims of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and to mislead voters about the need for fundamental reform in healthcare. I take it as a given that the opposition to the ACA has never been about its efficacy to promote certain goals to expand coverage for more Americans; even if the ACA accomplished its goals perfectly, those on the extreme political right would still oppose it. That is, the opposition from the political right is not about whether or not the ACA will work effectively but about ideology—they oppose the ACA as a matter of principle. They are committed to the view that government should not be involved in healthcare and fear, perhaps rightly, that if the ACA proves workable it would lead to a single payer system of universal coverage for all citizens. They apparently see healthcare services being like any other market service provided in a capitalistic society. But upon even a superficial analysis, this position is flawed.

It is basic to free markets that the ability of an individual to use a certain service or product is a function his or her ability to purchase it. One of the few services that is an exception in our current capitalistic society is healthcare, albeit only at the level of requiring services at an acute level. For example no matter how desperately I need transportation to go back and forth to work, I will not get a free car as a function of someone else’s obligation to provide it. This is not true of healthcare: even if I cannot pay for healthcare or I lack healthcare insurance, if I get sick enough and show up at an Emergency Room, I’ll not only be stabilized, I’ll be hospitalized and be given all I need to improve, or more fittingly, to be rescued from dying.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

October 28, 2013 | Posted By Jane Jankowski, LMSW, MS

With contentious changes afoot in the US healthcare system these days, one old problem seems to be gaining important attention as the public reflects on what will change with the advent of the Affordable Care Act. The cost of prescription medications is often so high; patients are forced to make tough choices in order to maintain their health without going broke. This topic was front page news in the New York Times (New York Times October 2013 ) this month where the focus was on escalating costs of asthma drugs. Compared to other nations, the expense of many common – and even not so common – medications is dramatically higher for consumers in the US. This is hardly news, and studies have been done showing that senior citizens were historically the hardest hit by medication costs given the intersection of age related health problems and fixed incomes with no prescription benefits. Though somewhat ameliorated when Medicare D was added, not all of the medication problems are resolved, particularly when an individual requires skilled nursing care in a nursing home (Medicare D and Nursing Home Residents.)

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

October 25, 2013 | Posted By Wayne Shelton, PhD

In the summer of 2009 when the Patient Protection Affordable Care Act, also known as the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Obamacare, was being widely discussed as a front burner political issue, I attended a town hall meeting held by my congressional representative, a moderate democrat, to listen to public comments before he decided whether or not to support the ACA. In the years following the disappointing implosion of healthcare reform during the Clinton administration, honestly, I did not expect to see the issue of healthcare reform back on the political agenda in my lifetime. So I was eager to attend and lend my support for a bill that would expand healthcare coverage for Americans and to hear my congressman respond to questions. When I arrived I was struck by the number of attendees and even more so by the large number of signs and placards with crude slogans linking ACA death panels, Nazism, killing grandma, etc. It was also striking that many of the people there were local working people who were members of the newly formed Tea Party and fierce opponents of the ACA. The negative views being expressed were passionate and urgent: Passage of the ACA would take our country down a path toward socialism, loss of freedom and government interference into the sacred domain of the physician-patient relationship.

Now that the ACA has passed both chambers of congress, signed by the president and ruled to be constitutional by the Supreme Court, there are still strong efforts by it opponents to stop its implementation. At present, the right wing of Republican Party in the house of representation has been willing to shut down our government and threaten default on our national debt unless the ACA is repealed or delayed. It is instructive to put the recent efforts to derail the ACA into historical context and see them as an extension of a century long effort, led by well-funded special interests groups to motivate American citizens through misinformation and scare tactics to vote against their own interests.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

SEARCH BIOETHICS TODAY
SUBSCRIBE TO BIOETHICS TODAY
ABOUT BIOETHICS TODAY
BIOETHICS TODAY is the blog of the Alden March Bioethics Institute, presenting topical and timely commentary on issues, trends, and breaking news in the broad arena of bioethics. BIOETHICS TODAY presents interviews, opinion pieces, and ongoing articles on health care policy, end-of-life decision making, emerging issues in genetics and genomics, procreative liberty and reproductive health, ethics in clinical trials, medicine and the media, distributive justice and health care delivery in developing nations, and the intersection of environmental conservation and bioethics.
TOPICS