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Topic: Health and the Internet
June 20, 2013 | Posted By Zubin Master, PhD

Last month, I covered in Part I of this blog the ethical debates surrounding the moral status of human embryos and the potential harms to women as egg providers for cloning research. I also described how the technique of research cloning (a.k.a. somatic cell nuclear transfer) works. For today’s blog post, I want to argue that bioethicists should not leave moral debates behind because the science of stem cell research has moved on in a different direction as it is likely to leave people uneasy and frustrated because no clear way to move forward has been resolved and the debate has almost ceased to continue.

Bioethical discourse surrounding the moral status of human embryos and payment of women for eggs became stagnant upon the discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). iPSCs were heralded as free of ethical concern because this technique creates hESC-like cells without the creation and destruction of human embryos and it doesn’t require eggs from women. The technique aims to dedifferentiate specialized cells (e.g., skin cells) into a more pluripotent state prior to directing their differentiation into specific cell types needed for repair or regeneration. Even George W. Bush in his Eight State of the Union address stated that the iPSC breakthrough can expand the frontiers of medicine without destroying life. Although iPSCs may obviate ethical concerns surrounding moral status and harms to women, they haven’t served to replace hESC research. In fact, one study shows that hESCs and iPSCs are being used together which makes sense because hESC research serves as a control for iPSC research. In addition, there are also many other ethical challenges to iPSC research including moral complicity as well as research ethics issues including informed consent, privacy and withdrawal. I have argued along with Gillian Crozier that perhaps an ethical and political compromise in stem cell research is needed in order to permit stem cell research to be performed using eggs and embryos for a certain period until such time that non-egg and non-embryo sources for the derivation of stem cells can be used. But because iPSCs have received such hype, ethics discourse around research cloning and deriving hESCs has received far less attention in the past 4-5 years.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

February 12, 2013 | Posted By Jane Jankowski, LMSW, MS

With the explosion of health information available online and in print media it can be difficult for consumers to determine which sources to trust and which ones to toss.  As with all of the material available on the World Wide Web, consumers must exercise caution and diligence when evaluating the veracity of internet information. While we may be pretty good at knowing how to determine which sites look trustworthy enough to safely manage credit card information or other private data, it may be more difficult for consumers to assess the reliability of health information on the internet. Given the sometimes high stakes involved in making healthcare decisions perhaps such sites should be required to include links which will connect consumers to tools which will train them to better evaluate health information in the media. Though this will not guarantee any given web surfer will take advantage of these links, but it could be a start to improving health information literacy.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

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BIOETHICS TODAY is the blog of the Alden March Bioethics Institute, presenting topical and timely commentary on issues, trends, and breaking news in the broad arena of bioethics. BIOETHICS TODAY presents interviews, opinion pieces, and ongoing articles on health care policy, end-of-life decision making, emerging issues in genetics and genomics, procreative liberty and reproductive health, ethics in clinical trials, medicine and the media, distributive justice and health care delivery in developing nations, and the intersection of environmental conservation and bioethics.
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