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Topic: Ethics Committees
June 24, 2013 | Posted By Wayne Shelton, PhD

The moral basis for competent, clinical ethics consultation, I would like to argue, is largely derived from the moral premises of our normative understanding of what it means to be a “good doctor” as reflected in a self-conscious commitment of a good physician to treat patients as best as one can according to prevailing standards of professionalism and medical ethical principles. The good doctor stands in relationship to a patient, within a well-defined framework of moral rights and professional obligations. This linkage between the activity of clinical ethics consultation and our understanding of a good physician further defines the work of the ethics consultant squarely in framework of clinical, medical competencies.  

To further see this linkage, it is useful to consider how and when value conflicts arise in the physician-patient relationship. For the vast majority of physician-patient encounters, there is agreement and absence of conflict. But in the less frequent cases of moral conflict, there are competing visions of what should happen—regarding the goals of care and who has the moral authority to define those goals. In short, how are competing rights and obligations to be balanced between the patient and physician, but also the surrogate, the hospital and potentially many other interests, especially in the midst of the emotion and stress that illness and impending death can induce both to patients and their families? It is the latter contextual aspect of grounding value conflicts within a patient’s and family’s illness experience, and the necessary ability to function effectively in clinical encounters, that requires the competent ethics consultant to also possess the general qualities of a caregiver, and to understand the moral perspective of a good physician.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

January 16, 2013 | Posted By Bruce White, DO, JD

Those involved in healthcare ethics consultation professionalism efforts face many challenges. Many – particularly academics involved in bioethics education – have been working on the notion that those who offer clinical ethics consultation services as individuals be appropriately credentialed, certified, or accredited in someway.

In re-reading an article by Diane Hoffmann, Anita Tarzian, and Anne O’Neil which appeared in the Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics in 2000, one striking challenge is readily apparent: ethics committee members – with little or no formal training in clinical ethics, little or no actual consultation experience, some with not much more than a sufficient interest in biomedical ethics issues and a willingness to serve – already feel competent to participate in offering consultation services. Moreover, from the Hoffmann-Tarzian-O’Neill data set, ethics committee members who self-report that they are competent to participate in clinical ethics consultation – and in hospitals which average only three consultations per year – believe that they are meeting their obligations to patients, families, staff, and institutions reasonably well.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

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BIOETHICS TODAY is the blog of the Alden March Bioethics Institute, presenting topical and timely commentary on issues, trends, and breaking news in the broad arena of bioethics. BIOETHICS TODAY presents interviews, opinion pieces, and ongoing articles on health care policy, end-of-life decision making, emerging issues in genetics and genomics, procreative liberty and reproductive health, ethics in clinical trials, medicine and the media, distributive justice and health care delivery in developing nations, and the intersection of environmental conservation and bioethics.
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