Topic: Discrimination
November 24, 2015 | Posted By Valerye Milleson, PhD

“I will not cease to be myself for foolish people. For foolish people make harsh judgments on me. You must always be yourself, no matter what the price. It is the highest form of morality.” – Candy Darling

November 24 this year marks the 71st anniversary of the birth of Candy Darling. She was an actress, an icon, and an Andy Warhol Superstar; she inspired two songs by Lou Reed/The Velvet Underground; she had cameos in movies with Jane Fonda and Sophie Loren; and she performed in a number of stage plays, including one by Tennessee Williams. She was glamorous and stunning, even in her deathbed photos, and Zsa Zsa Gabor reportedly referred to her as “one of the world’s most beautiful women.” She was also openly and publicly transgender in an era when being so was in some ways even more dangerous than it is today.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

September 11, 2015 | Posted By Wayne Shelton, PhD

In my last blog I wrote, what was in effect, a review of three books from my summer reading I did while on vacation. The first book covered the life of George Washington from the time of his resignation as General in the Continental Army, through his leadership in the Constitutional Convention in 1788, until his inauguration ceremony on 1789. The second book was a narrative history of the Great Migration of African Americans from the Jim Crow south to Northern and Western cities, and the hardships they endured throughout. And finally the third book was a contemporary description of what it is like to live in a black body today in the United States. I have been continuing my thoughts on the fate of blacks in America.

From the era of George Washington, we see the American political and social power structure becoming embedded into a political system filled, from the first moment with enormous hope but with equal, deeply troubling contradictions. There was eloquent language of the “many” no longer having to remain subservient to the “few” that seemed to reflect through reason the rights of human kind. Yet it was equally clear that Washington’s America was created to protect the financial interests of privileged white males as many human beings were excluded from participation in the new, fledgling nation, including women, native Americans who would be driven from the lands and basically exterminated, and African Americans, a few of whom were free but most enslaved as the property of white slave owners. 

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

August 21, 2015 | Posted By Wayne Shelton, PhD

I love to read novels and works of non-fiction in concentrated sittings so I can really lose myself in what I am reading. Because I am so busy during the course of my work-a-day professional life I rarely have such luxury. This is why vacation for me means a time when I can find a few really interesting books on my reading list and just devour them. Having recently returned from vacation and being overdue for my AMBI Blog, I thought I would share a few thoughts on my vacation reading, and even see if there is a lesson for bioethics.

This summer my reading was unusual in that it was all non-fiction, which included “The Return of George Washington” by Edward J. Larson, “The Warmth of Other Suns” by Isabel Wilkerson, and “Between the World and Me” by Ta-Nehisi Coates. I really didn’t plan to be reading these books together. But as it turns out, after finishing all three, I found a theme of interesting, often disturbing, questions about the past and present treatment of African Americans in the United States—questions that challenge the moral foundation and integrity of American democracy from its origins to the present.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

March 18, 2013 | Posted By John Kaplan, PhD

Recently the University of Pennsylvania Health System in Philadelphia announced that it would no longer hire tobacco smokers. This seemed like a smart move for several reasons. There are some pretty obvious benefits for the institution including reductions in employee health care costs, reduced rates of absenteeism due to sick days, fewer employee breaks, and the more minor advantages such as fewer people smelling of smoke. There are similarly benefits to individuals who can be convinced not to smoke by such policies. A longer healthier life spared of the expense and inconvenience of procuring these dangerous and addicting instruments should be reward enough. Thus firms which ban hiring of smokers help advance the cause of providing the twenty some percent of adults who still smoke a reason to quit. Moreover health care organizations seem to be the natural groups to take the lead in instigating this sort of social progress.

This is not a new trend. Turner Broadcasting System banned the hiring of smokers in the 1980s and has maintained this policy since. Similar bans on hiring smokers have been implemented by the Cleveland Clinic, Baylor University’s Hospital and the Geisinger Clinic. It all seems to make so much sense. Nevertheless there has been a reaction. Smokers are not a protected class under federal law. Federal law permits a company to discriminate against smokers. However no less than twenty-nine states , including here in New York State, have laws outlawing bans on the hiring of those who smoke. A list is provided here. This is a testimony to the power of the tobacco lobby.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

March 4, 2013 | Posted By Bruce D. White, DO, JD

Consider the following recent news articles. In one sentence, the alleged facts are that a hospital supervisor reassigned a 25-year-veteran neonatal intensive care unit nurse to “[honor] a father's request to not let black nurses treat his infant son.”

Patients and patients’ legally authorized representatives have rights in the provider-patient relationship. A number of states have codified some of these rights in statutes and regulations in ways that look like a “patient’s bill of rights.” Typical within these declarations are statements that give patients many broad choices with respect to care. Some may see this is an extension of a patient’s autonomous choices in healthcare delivery generally.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

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BIOETHICS TODAY is the blog of the Alden March Bioethics Institute, presenting topical and timely commentary on issues, trends, and breaking news in the broad arena of bioethics. BIOETHICS TODAY presents interviews, opinion pieces, and ongoing articles on health care policy, end-of-life decision making, emerging issues in genetics and genomics, procreative liberty and reproductive health, ethics in clinical trials, medicine and the media, distributive justice and health care delivery in developing nations, and the intersection of environmental conservation and bioethics.
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