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Topic: Affordable Care
December 15, 2014 | Posted By Wayne Shelton, PhD

The vast majority of developed nations in the world provide universal healthcare coverage for its citizens. The only developed nations that do not are “…a few still-troubled Balkan states, the Soviet-style autocracy of Belarus, and the U.S. of A., the richest nation in the world.” 

Yet the United States (US) has the most expensive healthcare system in the world, by far—there really isn’t a close second—spending just under 18% of GPD and around $8,500.00 per person on healthcare. One might assume that given that type of expense, we would be getting a lot more than other countries in return for our investment. According to the research provided by Mirror, Mirror, from the Commonwealth Fund, the US sadly underperforms and often fails relative to other developed countries on major measures of performance. 

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website. 

July 1, 2014 | Posted By Marleen Eijkholt, PhD

Crowdsourcing seems this month’s health care buzzword. It is everywhere. I’ve seen it used in three different health care contexts over the last months: 1) as a means to raise money for treatment, 2) as a means to gain access to treatments, and 3) as a means to help medical diagnoses.  In thinking about these contexts I found myself asking: Would I use it, or would I not? I am curious to hear if you would use the tool of crowdsourcing, after I give my ideas. Please feel free to comment at the end of my post.

What is crowdsourcing?

The dictionary defines crowdsourcing as: “the practice of obtaining needed services, ideas, or content by soliciting contributions from a large group of people and especially from the online community rather than from traditional employees or suppliers”In my own terms, crowdsourcing is an appeal to the online crowd/public to assist in a specific endeavor, like the above. Crowdsourcing is about ‘power in numbers’.  It could be an appeal to the public to raise money, signatures, or to gather information/expertise. 

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

May 12, 2014 | Posted By Wayne Shelton, PhD

Recently, the Governor of Tennessee signed into law a bill, SB 1391, which criminalizes a woman who has had a baby with drug-related complications.  As a result babies born with addictions due to drug use by the mother during pregnancy will be grounds for the mother being charged with aggravated assault, which could result in sentence of up to 15 years in prison for the mother. The concerns of the state legislators who promoted and passed this bill were over a condition in newborns called neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS).  This condition results from exposure to addictive drugs while in the mother’s womb. In 2013 the Tennessee state Health Department reported 921 babies born with NAS and 278 cases so far in the past four months. The stated goal of the law was to reduce the number of babies born with this condition. But is criminalizing drug use during pregnancy, in this first of its kind state law, the most effective way of accomplishing this goal?

It is important to note that the bill was passed against the strong objections of women’s rights groups as well as health care and addiction specialty groups. First of all these experts agree that cause more harm to babies as pregnant women will be afraid to seek medical care.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

December 19, 2013 | Posted By Wayne Shelton, PhD

There are some ominous social and political trends currently in American society on which the field of bioethics should focus more attention. In this informal and admittedly polemical blog, I would like to briefly explore a couple of them.

Governors from about half of the states, mostly from the Tea Party GOP, have invoked their constitutional right to deny healthcare coverage to individuals in their states who make less that 138% of the federal poverty level. These governors calmly claim that pragmatism, not politics, is the basis for their decision to refuse their states the opportunity to participate in the Medicaid expansion program under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). It’s just too costly and the Medicaid program is broken, so they say.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

December 12, 2013 | Posted By Bruce White, DO, JD

A July 28, 2012 article in The New York Times by Anne Lowry and Robert Pear titled “Doctor Shortage Likely to Worsen with Health Law” was recently updated with a follow-up report about Medicaid expansion by Abby Goodnough in a piece titled “Medicaid Growth Could Aggravate Doctor Shortage.” 

Many report that there’s not enough doctors now. It may be curious and rhetorical, but why would anyone suspect that there’s not going to be doctor shortages of some degree – in the very near future – if Medicaid expands by 9 million new persons and the Affordable Care Act (ACA) adds another 30 million or so newly-insured patients to those already covered by some plan. How could this not have been anticipated? It must have been factored into the ACA equation. In the same way that legislators should have realized that some insured would not be able to “keep their coverage” once the new health law was to take effect.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

November 25, 2013 | Posted By Wayne Shelton, PhD

The political right in the U.S. has mounted a formidable effort from the outset to mischaracterize the aims of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and to mislead voters about the need for fundamental reform in healthcare. I take it as a given that the opposition to the ACA has never been about its efficacy to promote certain goals to expand coverage for more Americans; even if the ACA accomplished its goals perfectly, those on the extreme political right would still oppose it. That is, the opposition from the political right is not about whether or not the ACA will work effectively but about ideology—they oppose the ACA as a matter of principle. They are committed to the view that government should not be involved in healthcare and fear, perhaps rightly, that if the ACA proves workable it would lead to a single payer system of universal coverage for all citizens. They apparently see healthcare services being like any other market service provided in a capitalistic society. But upon even a superficial analysis, this position is flawed.

It is basic to free markets that the ability of an individual to use a certain service or product is a function his or her ability to purchase it. One of the few services that is an exception in our current capitalistic society is healthcare, albeit only at the level of requiring services at an acute level. For example no matter how desperately I need transportation to go back and forth to work, I will not get a free car as a function of someone else’s obligation to provide it. This is not true of healthcare: even if I cannot pay for healthcare or I lack healthcare insurance, if I get sick enough and show up at an Emergency Room, I’ll not only be stabilized, I’ll be hospitalized and be given all I need to improve, or more fittingly, to be rescued from dying.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

October 25, 2013 | Posted By Wayne Shelton, PhD

In the summer of 2009 when the Patient Protection Affordable Care Act, also known as the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Obamacare, was being widely discussed as a front burner political issue, I attended a town hall meeting held by my congressional representative, a moderate democrat, to listen to public comments before he decided whether or not to support the ACA. In the years following the disappointing implosion of healthcare reform during the Clinton administration, honestly, I did not expect to see the issue of healthcare reform back on the political agenda in my lifetime. So I was eager to attend and lend my support for a bill that would expand healthcare coverage for Americans and to hear my congressman respond to questions. When I arrived I was struck by the number of attendees and even more so by the large number of signs and placards with crude slogans linking ACA death panels, Nazism, killing grandma, etc. It was also striking that many of the people there were local working people who were members of the newly formed Tea Party and fierce opponents of the ACA. The negative views being expressed were passionate and urgent: Passage of the ACA would take our country down a path toward socialism, loss of freedom and government interference into the sacred domain of the physician-patient relationship.

Now that the ACA has passed both chambers of congress, signed by the president and ruled to be constitutional by the Supreme Court, there are still strong efforts by it opponents to stop its implementation. At present, the right wing of Republican Party in the house of representation has been willing to shut down our government and threaten default on our national debt unless the ACA is repealed or delayed. It is instructive to put the recent efforts to derail the ACA into historical context and see them as an extension of a century long effort, led by well-funded special interests groups to motivate American citizens through misinformation and scare tactics to vote against their own interests.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

June 4, 2013 | Posted By Bruce White, DO, JD

In her Sunday, June 2, 2013, New York Times article titled “The 2.7 Trillion Medical Bill”, reporter Elizabeth Rosenthal reminds us once again that with the U.S. healthcare “system,” traditional economic market forces are a myth. In example after example, from angiogram to colonoscopy to hip replacement surgery to Lipitor to everyday radiology studies, she shows how U.S. costs are three-to-four times higher than charges in other countries, and how no one can really explain why. For this reason alone, why do some continue to insist on saying that American healthcare is sustained by free market forces as if it were another “business”?

Victor R. Fuchs – in his 1986 text The Health Economy – recalled that a typical market includes: (1) many well-informed buyers and sellers, with no large group of either able to influence price; (2) buyers and sellers acting independently; and (3) free entry of new buyers and sellers. The American healthcare market departs remarkably from these competitive conditions, often as a consequence of openly debated public policy. In America, it is very difficult for patients, consumers, “to vote with their feet” as Nobel Laureate Milton Friedman oft wrote.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

February 4, 2013 | Posted By Bruce White, DO, JD

A recent blog about a tragic situation in Tennessee highlights how difficult it is to create a “fair” healthcare system.

In this case, the patient is a nine-year-old severely disabled girl. She is maintained on a ventilator and feed through a tube. “She requires medicines and breathing treatments around the clock.” “She has to be suctioned every ten minutes or so to avoid suffocating on her own saliva.” She responds to family and caregivers minimally. And, she resides at home with her parents. Her father works and her mother is disabled with severe arthritis. Because family members cannot take care of her 24 hours a day, seven days a week, home health nurses provide most of the moment-to-moment care. However, home health nurses are very expensive, much more costly than if the patient were a patient in a nursing home (about $1000 a day).

The crux of the controversy between the parents and Tennessee’s Medicaid program – TennCare – is home care versus nursing home care. The parents want to keep their child at home with 24 hours nursing support, but TennCare will only pay for nursing home care in a skilled care facility.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

December 12, 2012 | Posted By Wayne Shelton, PhD

Recently, I attended a debate between two very informed health care professionals about whether or not our country should have a single payer health care system. Each seemed to have their own philosophical or ideological perspective about health care as a basic service in our society and it through their ideological lens that each speaker viewed health care and brought to bear the facts to support their positions. It was striking that these two very informed and thoughtful individuals often disagreed about fundamental facts pertaining to our health care system. 

For example, the opponent of a single payer system supported his claim that turning over health care to the federal government would be a failure at least in part on the assumption government is incompetent to perform this task. He claimed, as other thoughtful conservatives do, that that Medicare and Medicaid are less efficient than private health plans. If the analysis in the first link below, which is part of the Ryan Plan, is true, then perhaps there are some facts to support their case.

The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit ourwebsite.

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BIOETHICS TODAY is the blog of the Alden March Bioethics Institute, presenting topical and timely commentary on issues, trends, and breaking news in the broad arena of bioethics. BIOETHICS TODAY presents interviews, opinion pieces, and ongoing articles on health care policy, end-of-life decision making, emerging issues in genetics and genomics, procreative liberty and reproductive health, ethics in clinical trials, medicine and the media, distributive justice and health care delivery in developing nations, and the intersection of environmental conservation and bioethics.
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