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Graduate Studies Program

First Year Graduate Courses, Spring Semester


Cell Biology and Cancer Research

CBCR 603/604 - (CCBCR "Flagship" course: 6 credits in 2 modules)
Credits: 6 total
Director(s):

Description: See course descriptions for CBCR 603 and CBCR 604.

CBCR 604 - Tissue Remodeling and Cell Motility (CCBCR
Credits: 3
Director(s): Dr. Paula McKeown-Longo, Dr. C. Michael DiPersio, Dr. Livingston Van De Water

Description: This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the molecular mechanisms which regulate cell adhesion, migration and extracellular matrix remodeling. Sessions will consist of a one hour lecture followed by a one hour discussion of a related article from the primary literature. Students will also be required to present and lead the discussion of selected papers which support and extend key concepts presented in the lecture topics.

CBCR 502A - Journal Club
Credits: 1
Director(s): CBCR Faculty

Description: Students and faculty present papers on current research in Cell Biology & Cancer Research for review and discussion.

CBCR 603 - Signal Transduction (CCBCR)
Credits: 3
Director(s): Dr. Michelle Lennartz

Description: The is an upper-level, literature-driven course that begins with 5 didactic sessions covering the major components of cell signaling cascades. The remainder of the course is divided into 13 x 2 session modules focusing on specific signaling paradigms including signaling through lipid rafts, integrins, growth factors, hormones and catenins, and for apoptosis, inflammation, and gene regulation, among others. The modules consist of 1 didactic lecture and 1 session discussing the current literature. The course assumes a basic knowledge of biochemistry, molecular and cell biology. Discussions are student-led. Students are required to write one in-depth review article on a signaling system of their choice. There will be three non-comprehensive exams. In addition to the exams (60%), grades will be based on leading and participating in the discussions (10%), and the review paper (30%).

Research Colloquium - Student/Postdoctoral Fellow Presentations
Credits: 0

Immunology and Microbial Disease

IMD 501 - Research (both semesters)
Credits: Variable
Director(s): To be arranged

Description: Credit number is determined by student and mentor. Following the first year, all students must register for thesis research credits. Semester: Students must register for thesis research every semester following the first year.

IMD 502A - Research Colloquium (both semesters)
Credits: 1 (first year only; P/F subsequent years)
Director(s): Dr. Carlos de Noronha

Description: Student research symposium in which all CIMD students present their own research or critically evaluate a journal article of broad scientific interest. Required attendance and participation throughout each student's tenure. More than three unexcused absences will result in a Fail grade. However, only one credit will count towards each student's total didactic credits. Presenters: CIMD faculty, postdoctoral fellows and graduate students.  (Required all semesters)

IMD 504 A,B,C - Research Techniques in Biomedical Science
Credits: 1 each
Director(s):
Dr. Thomas D. Friedrich

Description: This course consists of the research rotations to be completed during the first year of study. Ph.D. students are required to complete three rotations in different laboratories as a prerequisite to choosing an mentor. Master students are required to complete 2 rotations prior to mentor selection. Taught every year during the Fall and Spring. First year students only. Instructors: Rotation mentor.  (Offered every year)

IMD 608 - Immunology
Credits: 3
Director(s): Dr. James Drake

Description: The course provides an introductory overview of immunology. Student evaluation will be based on exams and student presentations. Required of ALL IMD students. (Offered every year)


IMD 609 - Microbial Disease
Credits: 4
Director(s): Dr. Lisa Petti, Dr. Jing-Ren Zhang

Description: The course provides an introductory overview of microbial disease. Student evaluation will be based on exams. Required of all IMD students during their first year. (Offered every year)

Neuropharmacology and Neuroscience

NEU 502 - Neuroscience Journal Club
Credits: 1
Director(s): Dr. Mark Fleck

Description: This course is designed to teach students how to read and criticize current literature, and to help students learn how to communicate scientifically. Student presentations and participation are an integral part of this course. Center for Neuropharmacology & Neuroscience Students, faculty and post-doctoral fellows will make presentations on their own research or critically evaluate a journal article of broad scientific interest. Participation is an integral part of this course. Students are required to register for this course every semester that they are fully matriculated.

NEU 503 - Selected Topics in Neuroscience
Credits: 1
Director(s): Dr. Richard Keller, Dr. Lauren Jacobson

Description: This course is designed to teach students how to present their work effectively. The course is comprised of our general seminar program of invited speakers as well as seminars presented by our students. It provides the opportunity to hear the latest research progress in a number of pertinent areas, to see how experienced researchers present their data, and to give students experience in presenting their own data. Students also meet as a group to review and discuss all student presentations. While the course runs during both the Fall and Spring semesters, each student presents their research only once and all students register for the course only in the Spring semester.

NEU 504 B - Research Rotation
Credits: 1
Director(s): Faculty

Description: Research laboratory rotations of 10-12 weeks (including a 2-5 page report)are to be completed during the first year of study. Ph.D. students are required to complete three rotations in different laboratories as a prerequisite to selecting a mentor. Masters of Science students must complete two rotations prior to selecting a mentor.

NEU 504 B,C - Research Rotations
Credits: 1 per rotation
Director(s): Faculty

Description: Research laboratory rotations of 10-12 weeks (including a 2-5 page report)are to be completed during the first year of study. Ph.D. students are required to complete three rotations in different laboratories as a prerequisite to selecting a mentor. Masters of Science students must complete two rotations prior to selecting a mentor.

NEU 606 - Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
Credits: 3
Director(s): Dr. Richard Keller, Dr. Allan Schneider

Description: The material presented will provide an overview of the nervous system including the specialized structures of neurons and glia in relation to their functions. The two major areas of rapid cellular communication in the nervous system, conduction of electrical impulses along axons and chemical neurotransmission at synapses, will be covered in depth. Representative neurotransmitter systems will be discussed in detail, including their function, developmental neurobiology and the cellular basis of learning and memory in simple neuronal systems will be presented.

NEU 607 - Fundamentals of Pharmacology
Credits: 2
Director(s): Dr. Lindsay Hough

Description: An introduction will be provided to the principles by which drugs and other bioactive substances are absorbed, distributed and metabolized and how they act on biological systems. Topics include drug-receptor interactions, drug-effector interactions and pharmacokinetics.

Cardiovascular Sciences

CS 501 - Research
Credits: 1-15
Director(s): Student Mentor

Description: These credits are earned during thesis research in the laboratory. The number of credits is determined by the mentor.

CS 502 - Cardiovascular Sciences Research Colloquium
Credits: 0
Director(s): Dr. David Jourd'heuil

Description: Students and faculty present their research and/or state-of-the-art journal articles in Cardiovascular Sciences for review and discussion.
Course Format:Taken every semester

CS 504B,C - Research Rotation
Credits: 2, research
Director(s): Dr. Peter Vincent

Description: Research laboratory rotations to be completed during the first year of study. Ph.D. students are required to complete three rotations in different laboratories as a prerequisite to selecting a mentor.

CS 608 - Cardiovascular Physiology
Credits: 3
Director(s): Dr. Daniel Loegering

Description: This course provides a solid foundation in the basic physiology of the cardiovascular system. The fundamentals of cardiac mechanics, hemodynamics, electrocardiography, and cardiovascular reflexes are integrated into understanding the control of cardiac output and tissue blood flow. The importance of these parameters is illustrated by discussion of exercise and the pathophysiological changes associated with valve defects and heart failure.

Course Format: Classes consist of lectures, laboratories, clinical presentations, and problem-solving conferences. Grades for this course are based upon a final examination that consists of objective and problem solving questions.
Classes are at various times throughout the day for 3 weeks.

CS 609 - Respiratory and Renal Physiology
Credits: 4
Director(s): Dr. Donald Bell, Dr. Paul Feustel

Description: This course provides a solid foundation in basic physiology of the respiratory and renal systems. Basic concepts in gas exchange, pulmonary mechanics, ion transport processes, and nephron function are integrated into understanding the control of breathing and acid-base disorders. Basic concepts are extended into understanding the pathophysiology of abnormalities in ventilation perfusion and tissue oxygen delivery. The multiple transport processes within the kidney and their control are used to gain an understanding of a number of fluid and electrolyte disorders. There is a special emphasis on the quantitative analysis of clinical problems.

Course Format: Classes consist of lectures, laboratories, clinical presentations, and problem solving conferences. Grades for this course are based upon a final examination that consists of objective and problem-solving questions.
Classes and rooms will be the same as for the Medical Students. Classes are at various times throughout the day for 4 weeks.

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